Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · News · Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx
. . . .

Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx

None - August 19th, 2011  

An 1812 privateer prowls the lake once again

The privateer Lynx stopped by Frankfort recently and will be visiting Bay Harbor August 19- 28. Privateers were basically government-endorsed pirates.

Built in 1812 in Fell’s Point, Maryland, the privateer Lynx was one of the first ships to defend American freedom in the War of 1812, and one of only 17 ships in the American Navy’s fleet.

The term privateer was given to the ships via a special permission, or “letter of marque,” which allowed private vessels to prey upon the enemy’s shipping. The Lynx, with its superior sailing abilities, was an inspiration to future ships in the fleet - but was captured early in the war.

Today’s privateer Lynx was inspired by that 1812 vessel, but was built starting in 1997 by Woodson K. Woods. His goal was to craft a ship that would educate the public through tours and sailings aboard the Lynx itself.

In 2001, the “new” Lynx was completed and launched in Rockport, Maine. Past and present met on July 28 of that year, and continues to this day with the Lynx’s sailings and tours.

“Lynx today continues to inspire,” says Jeffrey Woods, director of operations for the Lynx Educational Foundation, “Lynx sails as a living history museum dedicated to ‘those who cherish the blessings of America.’”

PIRATES TO PENNANTS

Lynx also helped inspire a few faux pirates for a while, too; the ship was the training ground for the cast and crew of the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie starring Johnny Depp.

Today’s ‘civilian’ Lynx visitors are treated to a crew garbed in period clothing and a ship bedecked with pennants and flags from the 1812 era. Even the carronades (short, cast iron cannons) and swivel guns are authentic.

“Weaponry aboard Lynx are fitted with period ordnance, which is not too common to find on tall ships,” Woods explains.

Woods, who hires the crew to operate the ship, arranges port visits, handles the marketing and fundraising, and also oversees all of the ships’ operations, says that the Lynx harkens back to a different time.

“I think what attracts people to Lynx the most is that on decks and below, Lynx evokes the life, spirit, and atmosphere of a vanished age of sail,” he says, “Her deck guns are also always an interest to those who step aboard.”

FIVE YEAR MISSION

Several opportunities to step aboard will be available when the Lynx docks in Bay Harbor. Visitors can choose from a dockside tour, an “Adventure Sail,” or a “Sunset Sail,” all of which are sure to transmit a good feel for what it must have been like to work and live on a ship like the Lynx.

The Lynx travels year-round, and has been in Northern Michigan before (in Harbor Springs and Frankfort); the ship will be spending the next several years in transit to educate and, as Woods puts it, “to remind Americans of their proud heritage.”

“Having come around from Hawaii and California through the Panama Canal in 2009, Lynx is here on a five-year mission along the East Coast of the United States, the Great Lakes, and Canada to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812,” Woods says.

“Sailing in the Great Lakes has been terrific,” he continues, “there has been such tremendous support and interest in the ports we have visited. It is amazing to have sailed through all the fresh water lakes and support the effort to preserve them. Also Lynx herself enjoys the fact that we do not have to clean the bottom of the boat as there is little growth because of the fresh water. It has been a wonderful feeling for our crew to see so many people come down to see the ship and have so much appreciation for what we do.”

The Privateer Lynx will be visiting Bay Harbor from August 19 through August 28. For more information on the ship and tickets for its tours/sailings, visit them online at www.privateerlynx.com. The Lynx Educational Foundation always welcomes donations at 1-888-446-5969.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close