Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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Gateways offers a visionary trip to TC?s past

Robert Downes - June 27th, 2011
Gateways offers a visionary trip to TC’s past
By Richard Fidler
Horizon Books
By Robert Downes
It only takes a few moments to fall under the spell of historian Richard Fidler’s “Gateways to Grand Traverse Past,” a beautifully-envisioned tale of the ups and downs of life dating back 100 years ago and beyond.
A former teacher, this is Fidler’s third book of history, primarily about the Grand Traverse region but in many ways roaming further afield. Here, for instance, are the scores of black hobos who traveled north on the rails in the 1940s, hoping to pick cherries in the region’s orchards, only to be succeeded by imported Jamaican labor and Mexican migrants. Here are tales of circuses which marched in a line of elephants down the muddy streets of Front Street in the 1890s. Fidler lifts history from its dusty grave and breathes life into the past through eloquent writing and intelligent observations full of perception and wonder.

The theme of his book is based on the novel “Time and Again” by Jack Finney, which postulated the idea of ‘gateways’ that could lead time travelers back to previous ages. “These gateways were commonly buildings or scenes that existed unchanged from early times,” Fidler writes in his introduction. “The fabric of time was very thin at such points, and with the proper frame of mind, the traveler could rip it aside for a moment and walk back into the past…”
Fidler notes that Traverse City has many such gateways; he approaches his own journeys into the past in a conversational manner, sometimes assuming the first person. In his chapter, “Glimpsing a Forest Primeval,” for instance, he describes driving to tiny Ashton Park near Willow Hill Elementary School and Wayne Hill on the west side of town to experience one of the few old growth forests left in Northern Michigan.
He notes that the park property was purchased by the city in 1922, “in part because it was ‘virgin timber’” in a town that had degenerated into a muddy, clear-cut sea of stumps. Thanks to this foresight, today one can still find trees in the park that are nearly 3 feet in diameter with limbs 40 feet off the ground.
How many people in Traverse City are aware that such a natural treasure exists within the city limits? Reading Fidler’s account makes you want to visit Ashton Park to experience this wonder for yourself.
Speaking of trees, Fidler also writes about the bent “trail marker trees” created by the Ojibwe or Odawa people before the settlement of Traverse City in 1850. Once, residential Washington Street served as a section of a long-gone Indian trail extending from the Mackinac Straits to the Detroit area, with directional marker trees still in evidence on the street and at the Civic Center.

Fidler is at his best when his sense of humanity shines through, reminding us through his several books that poverty, starvation wages and struggle were the common fate of most citizens 100 years ago. He offers uplifting stories of people striving to better themselves, but doesn’t try to sugarcoat the past:
“A hundred years ago, the City was a community filled with optimism,” he writes. “…Traverse City was proud of its recent past, its growth from a tiny village within the last fifty years, its gorgeous setting on Grand Traverse Bay, its prosperous businesses, its churches, and its hard-working inhabitants. At the same time it struggled to present a fair face to the world; saloons lined Front Street and drinkers fought in the streets outside them. Factory workers were paid poverty wages and worked ten-hour days, six days a week. Native Americans were the poorest of the poor, frequently suffering from alcoholism. The Boardman River was an open sewer as it flowed through town and the brown and dusty plains of the city, together with the surrounding hills denuded of trees, presented an abused landscape to visitors.”
Fidler captures the tough breaks of those times with his essays on places like Hobo Point, a spot on Boardman Lake where trains used to slow down long enough for down-on-their-luck migrant workers to jump off or on. Of note, the area around Hobo Point still serves as a homeless camping area today -- no different than 100 years ago.
Then there’s his account of “The Battle of Pine River” in which 15 unarmed Mormons from Beaver Island were attacked by a band of 20 fishermen after landing at the Pine River Channel in Charlevoix in 1853. The posse (whose mission has since been under dispute) fled for their lives with six men wounded by musket fire. Their lives were saved only by the arrival of a passing ship which took them aboard and chased off three boats in hot pursuit.
At 138 pages, “Gateways” is a quick read, but be forewarned: you’ll likely want to linger over its pages and re-read passages, savoring Fidler’s prose and his images of a lost way of life that seems closer than you might imagine.
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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