Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Unexpected Exceptionalism...
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Unexpected Exceptionalism

Stephen Tuttle - July 11th, 2011
Unexpected Exceptionalism
While searching YouTube for something, and I honestly don’t remember
exactly what,
I stumbled across the 2008 version of France’s incarnation of the Got
Talent franchise. Of course, they call theirs Incroyable Talent.
There, I met a beautiful 12-year-old named Caroline Costa. A giggly little
girl, it turned out she had a stage presence and voice equal to any
current mega-star. You knew within the first couple of seconds of her
audition she was something out of the ordinary.
We love those moments of unexpected exceptionalism that temporarily take
our breath away, catch in our throat and leave us shaking our heads in
dumb wonder. We look at each other to make sure we’re not the only one so
afflicted.
Actually, the Got Talent franchise has produced more than one of them.
There was American Jackie Evancho, the 11-year-old opera singer with the
bubbly personality and perfect voice. And, the British version gave us the
now legendary Susan Boyle, who looked and acted like someone least likely
to succeed until she started singing and peoples’ hearts momentarily
stopped.
Sports is a fertile field for both the unexpected and the exceptional.
In the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, American Bob Beamon was
expected to win the gold medal in the long jump, an event in which world
records are typically broken by an inch or less. Nobody expected what
actually unfolded.
On his first attempt, in perfect conditions, Beamon nearly jumped beyond
the landing pit. In fact, he did out-jump the optical device used to
measure distance so they had to do it the old-fashioned way with a tape
measure. Minutes ticked away as Beamon nervously paced. When the
distance was finally posted metrically, not everyone, including Beamon,
understood what it meant. When a teammate finally told him, he crumpled to
the ground, unable to comprehend what he had just done. No wonder. Beamon
had broken the world record by a stupefying 21 3⁄4 inches. His new
record stood for more than two decades and is still the Olympic record, 43
years later.
Sometimes it isn’t even a human being that generates that feeling.
In 1973, the great Secretariat was on his way to winning the Triple Crown
with only the final leg, the Belmont Stakes, remaining. He had already
set records in winning the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. Though no
horse race is ever a “sure thing”, bettors had made Secretariat a
ridiculous 1 to 10 favorite.
The race itself was competitive for awhile but Secretariat began surging
ahead on the backstretch and it appeared he was extending that lead with
every stride. Chick Anderson, who called the race that day, famously said
Secretariat was “... moving like a tremendous machine...”. As the horses,
or at least one horse, rounded the final turn and headed for Belmont
Park’s long home stretch, the roaring crowd quieted for just a bit as if
preparing for this incredible thing they were about to witness.
Something incredible is exactly what they did witness. Secretariat won by
a preposterous 31 lengths – more than a football field – in a time that is
still the world record for a mile and half distance on a dirt track.
Such a moment can also be sent our way by someone completely anonymous.
In 1989, protesters in China gathered in Tiananmen Square in Beijing
demanding greater freedom. The Chinese government crushed their
mini-revolt with tanks and live ammunition.
There was, however, a completely unexpected and completely exceptional
moment. As tanks rumbled down the street, one man simply walked out and
stood in front of the lead tank. However that tank moved to get around
him, he moved in front of it.
Bystanders or secret police, depending on which version you believe,
finally dragged him out of the street. Some say he was later executed,
others that he was imprisoned and, still others, that he was never
identified or punished. Whatever the case, his boldness was breathtaking.
These moments most certainly happen in other, less publicized fields, too.
The educator’s breakthrough when the lightbulb finally goes off in a
student’s head; the scientist’s astonishing discovery. That the media
doesn’t cover them and we don’t see them doesn’t mean they don’t happen.
One field in which those moments no longer happen is politics. When is
the last time anyone from either party surprised us by doing something so
unexpected it transcended partisanship?
Our country is wallowing in debt, unemployment seems stuck at an
unacceptable 9%, we’re at war on three fronts and our politicians have
decided the solution is to see who is best at demeaning their opponent.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has provided us with
the best example of what we don’t need. His top priority is not the
deficit or the war on terrorism or unemployment or anything that could
pass for an actual issue. No, as he’s said many times, his top priority is
“making sure Obama is not re-elected”.
Well, thanks very much, Mitch. That should make for an interesting 17
months of accomplishing absolutely nothing.
It’s not as if the Democrats, whose spines and platform have apparently
drifted out to sea never to be seen again, are any better.
What we need is one of those moments. What we need is for President Obama
and Speaker of the House Boehner to step forward, together, and
acknowledge that fixing the damned budget mess and generating some jobs is
more important than anyone’s election.
We need Democrats to admit the problem cannot be fixed just by raising
taxes on the rich and the GOP to admit it can’t be fixed just by slashing
away at programs for the poor and sick. And both have to get serious
about reforming Medicare and Social Security in a way that protects
recipients and improves the bottom line rather than their chances in the
next election.
That would be unexpected. And exceptional.

 
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