Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Life in a Small, Superior Town
. . . .

Life in a Small, Superior Town

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - June 27th, 2011
Life in a Small, Superior Town
By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli
South of Superior 
By Ellen Airgood
Riverhead Books/Penguin Group
$25.95
As small towns go, McAllaster, Michigan, isn’t much.  Typical UP town.  It’s got plain people, a lot of characters, a few newbies out to change a culture in place for a few hundred years, and some who just want to fit in.  This town’s got elderly sisters and down-at-the-heels oldsters who live off the land.  It’s got struggling businesses, and people with hope, and those without hope.  Everything small town’s have is here in McAllaster, the centerpiece of a first novel by Ellen Airgood, who runs a diner in Grand Marais, and captures people, places, life, and small stories writ large in “South of Superior.”
Change is coming to McAllaster.  It comes in through the Bensons who buy the grocery store and cut off credit to people who’ve had an ‘arrangement’ with the store since they first got credit.  It comes through others with pretensions, trying to do away with those eyesores out near the highway.  You’ve seen them: rusting truck in the yard, at least one car up on blocks, and the old sofa sagging on the porch.  Change comes in through Madeline Stone, a 33-year-old wannabe painter, who leaves Chicago to avoid a marriage that didn’t seem right to come to McAllaster to care for an elderly woman entwined with the family Madeline never knew.  

ANGER TOO
The change in Madeline Stone’s life comes with a lot of anger—Madeline’s mother abandoned her as a young child and her grandfather, Joe, alive in the UP, didn’t want her though no one in McAllaster wants to talk about her past.  In change comes through dreams of making a living in this small town, among these people slow to accept anything new, in this tiny place on the shores of Lake Superior.  
Madeleine, a Chicago waitress with an old car that barely runs and a stack of questions for people in her family, arrives in McAllaster on a sleety night.  From her first look at the town, something stirs in her:  The town sat at the base of a steep hill at the edge of the water, a lovely collection of buildings she could take in all in one glance from this distance.  Huddled under the sleet that had been falling for hours, it looked stark and desolate.  And beautiful.
It’s the beautiful part that grabs her first.  And then Arbutus and Gladys, elderly sisters caught in a trap of no money to help themselves until they decide to let loose of things holding them to a past slowly strangling them.  There is Mary, a very old woman who lives in a couple of clabbered together sheds, and Emil, the town alcoholic and hunter and firewood provider.   In the way of human beings, everybody’s got a story that entwines with other stories until the end, or at least change, comes about.
This is Ellen Airgood’s first novel and what an accomplishment it is.  Much like her autobiography, she faces the lives of her characters straight on.  Airgood says her philosophy about life and people is that life is “a big, hard, wonderful mess -- an amazing ride: that we’re meant to savor at every turn.” 
Airgood tells about visiting Grand Marais with her sister when she was 25 years old and falling in love with the owner of the local diner.  That was it.  She moved north and has waitressed for the last 20 years in her now husband’s diner.  “My husband Rick and I run the diner together . . . Most of what I know about maturity and compassion, not to mention story, I’ve learned from waiting tables.  We work 80 to 100 hours a week almost year round.  We’ve been faced with a constant barrage of setbacks and frustrations and equipment failures.”
Yet she found time to write.

TWIST OF FATE
On writing this novel, she says, “I didn’t get an MFA or study writing in school.  I could have learned about life anywhere, but fate brought me here, to the end of the earth and a tiny town that time forgot.”
Her ear for the northern voice is perfect; her humanity—looking at people caught in time and place—refreshing.  This is a fine Michigan novelist at the beginning of her career.  The waitressing, learning life’s lessons every day, will keep her voice authentic and individual.  She’s a writer much like Ann Tyler, with a kind of Hardyesque knowledge of place.   Airgood pulls off what could be dull stuff—small town secrets and battles; a bunch of old timers; forgiveness of the worst sinners among them—and makes it all into a story impossible to put down.  Even after finishing the book, the characters haunted me as if they’d taken on separate lives in my head where I keep Tess of the D’Urbervilles, The Beans of Egypt, Maine, and just about all of Ann Tyler’s people.
The stories reveal lost loves and found loves and new loves at every age.  It’s a story of digging to find out who you really are and where you belong and of forgiving just about everybody—eventually.  It is truly a Michigan story.  Madeleine eventually takes on the old hotel in town, sinks all she’s got into it, and ends with a lot of hope, very little money, but a circle of family and friends she would never have found anywhere else.
South of Superior is the kind of book you want to curl up with and sink into.  It unravels slowly—character by character, event by event.  Nothing in here is earth shaking or deeply revealing.  This is about real people—individuals, who find their worth in what they believe, how they take on the world.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli’s fourth novel in the Emily Kincaid mystery series, “Dead Dogs and Englishmen,” comes out from Midnight Ink Books in July.  She’s inviting everyone to come celebrate the launch of the new book on Friday, July 22, 6:30 pm, Brilliant Books in Sutton’s Bay. 


 
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close