Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Echoes
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Echoes

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - July 11th, 2011
A Civil War soldier wins an inner conflict in Echoes
Echoes of Distant Thunder
By Frank P. Slaughter
Arbutus Press
By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli
You’re going to like Will Castor. This simple Civil War soldier is going to captivate you and show you a very different kind of war. “Echoes of Distant Thunder” by Frank P. Slaughter isn’t one of those big Civil War books we’re all used to, but something much smaller and more personal, a look into the depths and scope of one man’s soul.
The story begins in 1971 with an inheritance coming to Paul, Will Castor’s great great grandson: an antique wooden box containing some old letters, a pocket watch, and a Civil War-era revolver. The watch, inscribed “Love Always, Mollie,” is a mystery as is Will’s tombstone with the word “Peep” carved beneath the Civil War designation of Pvt Bat D 1st Mich Art (Private in Battery D, 1st Michigan Artillary).
With these two mysteries in place we’re sent back in time. Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. Another sleepless night for Union private, Will Castor, and a day of relentless battle. The Union is losing ground. They are withdrawing. Since just before daylight the cold, heavy air had carried the deep rumble of artillery fire to them from somewhere over on the left, and it had steadily increased in volume and urgency as the morning wore on.
The battle continued: The guns of Battery D were taking a terrible toll on the Confederates as they crossed the old cornfield, but they could not fire fast enough to stem the tide, and all six guns were running out of ammunition.

HORRIBLE ACTS
Friends and comrades die terribly around this country boy from Michigan. The aftermath of that day’s war being that he’s forced into horrible acts he would never have considered in his earlier, simpler life.
One of the strengths of the book is that the author doesn’t intrude, never judges, simply lets Will go about staying alive, moving from crisis to crisis, until he is home, in Michigan, again. Unfortunately he’s home with dreams that haunt him, and scenes in his head that fill him with guilt
In Michigan, Will tries to make a life for himself as a changed man but he travels through the rural world of northwest Michigan as if he deserves nothing, let alone to be left alive. The lumber camps draw Will into the rough life of men alone in the woods. As with the rest of the book, nothing is glossed over, only bare truths are given, which are sometimes funny. The lumberjacks, most of whom considered it unhealthy to bathe more than once a year, were beginning to give some thought to personal hygiene. The bane of all the men was the louse, body louse or crab louse; they all were hosts to both varieties. With this wealth of personal livestock, the lumbermen came up with a non-contact sport that involved pitting one louse against the other in fights to the death. It is here, in the lumber camp that Will faces another challenge, and himself, when he comes close to blindly killing a man simply because he can.
Will heads farther north again and straight into the path of a terrible forest fire burning the state from coast to coast: ...the next morning the smoke was even thicker and the wind had picked up and swung around to the southwest . . . Will weighed his options and quickly decided against trying to outrun the fire. He pulled his boots and socks off and stuffed them in one of G.D.’s packs and then picked up the mule’s lead and waded out into the lake.
Will survives another trial by fire.

EVERY MAN’S TALE
Details of Michigan history, woven through the narrative, ground the story firmly in place and give a peek behind the curtain of time. These are events we’ve heard of. And now we have a winsome character taking us to places like the Michigan Battalion in the Civil War where we are a part of a devastating day and a cruel loss. And then the forest fires that leveled Chicago and much of Wisconsin and Michigan. We’re taken to lumber camps and graphic stories of camp life—funny and cruel, to the way men set up business at that time, found wives, made a life for themselves, and left secrets behind.
Eventually Will finds his way to Monroe Center, between Sherman and Traverse City, and a measure of peace. The frame for the story, through the use of the great great grandson and the mysteries surrounding Will work beautifully to highlight portions of his life. The author is very much in charge of his work, not bleeding dry the scenes of carnage but always keeping us in the head of this simple man who is probably Every Man: likeable in his plodding way; understandable in his quiet misery; victorious by his own measure of victory.
On many levels, Echoes of Distant Thunder is a very good book.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli’s fourth book in the Emily Kincaid mystery series is in stores now. The public is invited to the launch of “Dead Dogs and Englishmen” at Brilliant Books in Sutton’s Bay on Friday, July 22, 7 pm. Wine, cheese, and the music of Noel Coward will be featured.
 
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