Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Partners in the arts; Julie...
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Partners in the arts; Julie Kradel & Steve Kostyshyn

Rick Coates - July 11th, 2011
Partners in the Arts: Creative Julie Kradel and Steve Kostyshyn of Blue Crow Farm
By Al Parker
Combine two different artists with two distinctive styles and the result
is one dynamic farm-based studio that’s producing eye-grabbing artwork in
Leelanau County.
Julie Kradel and Steve Kostyshyn share the airy, well-lit studio at Blue
Crow Farm, their 20-acre home on a quiet road near Cedar. While they each
have their own individual methods and techniques, the result is artworks
that are gaining a legion of collectors.
“For over two decades, my work has been exploring the relationships
between animals, their human admirers and each other,” says Kradel, whose
works are generally sculptures and tiles featuring horses, turtles, foxes,
rabbits and other animals. “The clay, being a very natural and Earth-based
medium, has allowed me a framework in which to capture these unique
interactions.
Observing the creatures that inhabit Blue Crow Farm allow Kradel to
breathe realism and life into her work. They’re a constant inspiration and
reminder “to keep her work true.”
“The creative process in which my clay art is produced, in concert with an
adherence to correct bone, musculature and form, allows me to express the
joy and beauty nature’s beasts possess using a unique blend of whimsy and
precise structure,” says the native upstate New Yorker who lived in
Davisburg, south of Flint, before moving north in 2007.

DRAWING INSPIRATION
Many of Kradel’s works focus on horses and their relationship with other
animals. She’s a longtime horse owner and draws inspiration from her
steed, John Henry. Her pieces are captivating, yet clever in their
simplicity and emotion. “All my life I’ve done artwork,” she says. “And
I’ve always loved horses.”
Kostyshyn has been making award-winning pottery, in one form or another,
for more than 30 years. He’s been featured in exhibitions in
Massachusetts, California, Wisconsin and Michigan.
The New Jersey native graduated from Adrian College in 1976 and worked as
a studio potter for 15 years. He apprenticed with Brumm’s Studios and Todd
Warner Studios in Charlevoix. “Todd really showed me the ropes of the art
business,” says Kostyshyn. “I learned a lot from him.”
From 1981 to 1993 Kostyshyn worked in porcelain, then crafted stoneware
with a Majolica influence from 1993 to 1997.
His focus then shifted to create mixed media baskets and vessels that
combine clay, fiber and wood. His popular, collectible works explore
texture, color, form and size that is impossible with pieces created only
of clay.
“My baskets are made with a combination of three materials – clay, reed
and wood,” he explains. “The clay is a high-fired stoneware with dipped,
brushed and poured glazes. The challenge here is to have a clear vision of
the completed basket before starting the piece.”
Using traditional wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques, Kostyshyn
finishes the clay parts first. Once he’s completed them, he’ll shape and
bend the green oak ribs for a larger basket. On other pieces, he positions
and glues reed or dowel spokes in place. This stabilizes the form for the
weaving.
The final process is the weaving of the entire spoked area. He uses
natural and dyed reeds and weaves plaited and twilled patterns. He often
chooses palm, vine rattan, red osler, willow or birch bark as accents.
They lend a natural feel and texture to his works.
“I have been continually inspired to work with the vessel as form,” says
the outgoing Kostyshyn. “Breaking from the ‘clay-only’ vessel and
exploring possibilities afforded by basketry as an aft form, has allowed
me to explore shapes and textures that were unattainable to me in the
past.”

THE SHOW CIRCUIT
Not only do Kostyshyn and Kradel differ in their artistic styles, they
also have divergent ideas about marketing their works. Kostyshyn’s been
doing art shows for three decades and prefers the hustle and bustle of the
show circuit.
In a typical year, he sets up at 11 different shows, from Northern
Michigan to Florida. In coming weeks he’ll be at shows in Glen Arbor on
July 20, Suttons Bay on Aug. 6-7 and Charlevoix on Aug. 13. His works are
also at the Bier Art Gallery in Charlevoix and the Michigan Artists
Gallery in Suttons Bay.
“I love the travel and meeting people from all walks of life,” he says.
“One nice thing about shows is you get direct, immediate feedback (about
your work). Sometimes you get ideas from people. But I miss my farm and
it’s always good to get back.”
At one recent show, the affable Kostyshyn sold one of his works to a
couple who had a unique way to pay for his pottery.
“They had been to the same show a year earlier and decided to save their
pocket change for an entire year and buy something at this year’s show,”
he recalls. “So they put away their dimes and quarters for a year and
walked all through the show to pick something they really liked to spend
their savings on. I was honored when they picked my basket for their
special purchase.”
Kradel prefers displaying her items in galleries, including Viola’s
Gallery in Elk Rapids, Bier Art Gallery in Charlevoix and Cog’s Creek
Gallery in Traverse City. But she’s not averse to doing an occasional art
show and will be setting up in Glen Arbor on July 20.
“My life is so great,” she says with a smile. “I’m doing the thing I
always wanted to do in my life with a man I enjoy being with so much.”
Blue Crow Farm is also the home of horses Abe and John Henry, a few dogs
and recently, several Katahdin sheep. Katahdin are hardy, adaptable, low
maintenance sheep that produce superior lamb crops and lean, meaty
carcasses.  They do not produce a fleece and therefore do not require
shearing. 
“We have an open studio,” says Kradel. “And people are always welcome to
come out.”

 
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