Letters

Letters 05-23-2016

Examine The Priorities Are you disgusted about closing schools, crumbling roads and bridges, and cuts everywhere? Investigate funding priorities of legislators. In 1985 at the request of President Reagan, Grover Norquist founded Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). For 30 years Norquist asked every federal and state candidate and incumbent to sign the pledge to vote against any increase in taxes. The cost of living has risen significantly since 1985; think houses, cars, health care, college, etc...

Make TC A Community For Children Let’s be that town that invests in children actively getting themselves to school in all of our neighborhoods. Let’s be that town that supports active, healthy, ready-to-learn children in all of our neighborhoods...

Where Are Real Christian Politicians? As a practicing Christian, I was very disappointed with the Rev. Dr. William C. Myers statements concerning the current presidential primaries (May 8). Instead of using the opportunity to share the message of Christ, he focused on Old Testament prophecies. Christ gave us a new commandment: to love one another...

Not A Great Plant Pick As outreach specialist for the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network and a citizen concerned about the health of our region’s natural areas, I was disappointed by the recent “Listen to the Local Experts” feature. When asked for their “best native plant pick,” three of the four garden centers referenced non-native plants including myrtle, which is incredibly invasive...

Truth About Plants Your feature, “listen to the local experts” contains an error that is not helpful for the birds and butterflies that try to live in northwest Michigan. Myrtle is not a native plant. The plant is also known as vinca and periwinkle...

Ask the Real Plant Experts This letter is written to express my serious concern about a recent “Listen To Your Local Experts” article where local nurseries suggested their favorite native plant. Three of the four suggested non-native plants and one suggested is an invasive and cause of serious damage to Michigan native plants in the woods. The article is both sad and alarming...

My Plant Picks In last week’s featured article “Listen to the Local Experts,” I was shocked at the responses from the local “experts” to the question about best native plant pick. Of the four “experts” two were completely wrong and one acknowledged that their pick, gingko tree, was from East Asia, only one responded with an excellent native plant, the serviceberry tree...

NOTE: Thank you to TC-based Eagle Eye Drone Service for the cover photo, taken high over Sixth Street in Traverse City.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Lee & Lucinda
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Lee & Lucinda

Kristi Kates - July 11th, 2011
Lee and Lucinda bring American roots to Interlochen
By Kristi Kates
Country Weekly called Amos Lee and Lucinda Williams’ “Clear Blue Eyes” duet single ‘a heartbreaking piece of classic country.’
Williams has also joined Lee onstage at his solo shows.
And Lee’s latest album, Mission Bell, released in January of this year, features Williams on that same song, as well as other guest appearances from Calexico and Iron and Wine’s Sam Beam.
Williams’ new set, Blessed, hit stores this past March, and blends her Americana mix of rock, blues and country into another landmark album for the performer; recently married, she’s entering another chapter in her life both musically and personally, as well.
Both of these musicians, now on the road for a July tour, will be appearing - together - at Interlochen this month for a show that’s sure to be a standout.

AMOS LEE
Singer-songwriter and guitarist Lee is now on his fourth album on Blue Note Records, and this tour with Williams isn’t his first trip around the block.
The dusky-voiced, blazer-wearing, mysteriously-named musician (no one’s quite sure exactly where his “Amos Lee” moniker came from) and former elementary-school teacher has also shared the stage with such performers as Norah Jones, Paul Simon, Dave Matthews Band, Bob Dylan, and Adele, bringing along his own drummer, Fred Berman, and his bassist Jaron Olevsky.
Blending folk with jazz and soul, Lee’s Philly influences can be heard throughout his songs, from his debut self-produced EP, which initially caught the attention of Jones, through Mission Bell’s “acoustic soul” effort. He’s another artist whose songs have proved to be evocative enough to serve as score for a wide variety of media, from his songs’ appearances in Studio 60, Army Wives, Grey’s Anatomy, and ER to movies like Just Like Heaven and even an AT&T commercial that proved to be a fan favorite.

LUCINDA WILLIAMS
Meanwhile, Williams - she of the Chrissie Hynde eyeliner, truck-stop waitress hair, and distinctive vocal stylings - has a few years on Lee, having recorded her first album back in 1978.
Although a sophomore album followed in 1980, she first really gained attention as a songwriter when Mary Chapin Carpenter recorded a cover of Williams’ song “Passionate Kisses.” The result? Williams was awarded a songwriter Grammy for Best Country Song, which helped boost her success.
A critic’s favorite, Williams has also been noted as a favorite duet partner and even song topic, first for Steve Earle (she sang with him on his song “You’re Still Standin’ There) and then for Vic Chestnutt, who had a song titled “Lucinda Williams” on one of his albums.
1998 was finally a breaking point for Williams’ own songs, as her album Car Wheels on a Gravel Road snagged her a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album (bolstered by the inclusion of one of her songs in the Robert Redford movie The Horse Whisperer.) She’d go on to collaborate with the likes of Ryan Adams, Flogging Molly, Elvis Costello, and, of course Amos Lee.
Now settled in Nashville, she still keeps out of the loop to some degree, but keeps crafting music on a regular basis, both as a collaborator and as a solo artist; Blessed features a personal range of complex emotions and tales.

AMOS, MEET LUCINDA
Elusiveness is one thing these two performers have in common, but another more important element is their shared penchant for earnest, earthy music that showcases the best elements of their individual approaches to songs that tell emotional stories and keep both performers and fans grounded.
Lee’s headlining spring tour, which included a stop at Bonnaroo and one at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, will segue right into his dates with Williams, who guested on Lee’s new album. It’s anyone’s guess whether she’ll also step out on stage for that critically-acclaimed duet, but one thing fans can be sure of is another great Interlochen show from these two seasoned performers.

Lucinda Williams and Amos Lee will be performing in concert at Interlochen on July 13 at 8:00 p.m.; tix available online via http://tickets.interlochen.org.

 
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