Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Lee & Lucinda
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Lee & Lucinda

Kristi Kates - July 11th, 2011
Lee and Lucinda bring American roots to Interlochen
By Kristi Kates
Country Weekly called Amos Lee and Lucinda Williams’ “Clear Blue Eyes” duet single ‘a heartbreaking piece of classic country.’
Williams has also joined Lee onstage at his solo shows.
And Lee’s latest album, Mission Bell, released in January of this year, features Williams on that same song, as well as other guest appearances from Calexico and Iron and Wine’s Sam Beam.
Williams’ new set, Blessed, hit stores this past March, and blends her Americana mix of rock, blues and country into another landmark album for the performer; recently married, she’s entering another chapter in her life both musically and personally, as well.
Both of these musicians, now on the road for a July tour, will be appearing - together - at Interlochen this month for a show that’s sure to be a standout.

AMOS LEE
Singer-songwriter and guitarist Lee is now on his fourth album on Blue Note Records, and this tour with Williams isn’t his first trip around the block.
The dusky-voiced, blazer-wearing, mysteriously-named musician (no one’s quite sure exactly where his “Amos Lee” moniker came from) and former elementary-school teacher has also shared the stage with such performers as Norah Jones, Paul Simon, Dave Matthews Band, Bob Dylan, and Adele, bringing along his own drummer, Fred Berman, and his bassist Jaron Olevsky.
Blending folk with jazz and soul, Lee’s Philly influences can be heard throughout his songs, from his debut self-produced EP, which initially caught the attention of Jones, through Mission Bell’s “acoustic soul” effort. He’s another artist whose songs have proved to be evocative enough to serve as score for a wide variety of media, from his songs’ appearances in Studio 60, Army Wives, Grey’s Anatomy, and ER to movies like Just Like Heaven and even an AT&T commercial that proved to be a fan favorite.

LUCINDA WILLIAMS
Meanwhile, Williams - she of the Chrissie Hynde eyeliner, truck-stop waitress hair, and distinctive vocal stylings - has a few years on Lee, having recorded her first album back in 1978.
Although a sophomore album followed in 1980, she first really gained attention as a songwriter when Mary Chapin Carpenter recorded a cover of Williams’ song “Passionate Kisses.” The result? Williams was awarded a songwriter Grammy for Best Country Song, which helped boost her success.
A critic’s favorite, Williams has also been noted as a favorite duet partner and even song topic, first for Steve Earle (she sang with him on his song “You’re Still Standin’ There) and then for Vic Chestnutt, who had a song titled “Lucinda Williams” on one of his albums.
1998 was finally a breaking point for Williams’ own songs, as her album Car Wheels on a Gravel Road snagged her a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album (bolstered by the inclusion of one of her songs in the Robert Redford movie The Horse Whisperer.) She’d go on to collaborate with the likes of Ryan Adams, Flogging Molly, Elvis Costello, and, of course Amos Lee.
Now settled in Nashville, she still keeps out of the loop to some degree, but keeps crafting music on a regular basis, both as a collaborator and as a solo artist; Blessed features a personal range of complex emotions and tales.

AMOS, MEET LUCINDA
Elusiveness is one thing these two performers have in common, but another more important element is their shared penchant for earnest, earthy music that showcases the best elements of their individual approaches to songs that tell emotional stories and keep both performers and fans grounded.
Lee’s headlining spring tour, which included a stop at Bonnaroo and one at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, will segue right into his dates with Williams, who guested on Lee’s new album. It’s anyone’s guess whether she’ll also step out on stage for that critically-acclaimed duet, but one thing fans can be sure of is another great Interlochen show from these two seasoned performers.

Lucinda Williams and Amos Lee will be performing in concert at Interlochen on July 13 at 8:00 p.m.; tix available online via http://tickets.interlochen.org.

 
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