Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Lee & Lucinda
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Lee & Lucinda

Kristi Kates - July 11th, 2011
Lee and Lucinda bring American roots to Interlochen
By Kristi Kates
Country Weekly called Amos Lee and Lucinda Williams’ “Clear Blue Eyes” duet single ‘a heartbreaking piece of classic country.’
Williams has also joined Lee onstage at his solo shows.
And Lee’s latest album, Mission Bell, released in January of this year, features Williams on that same song, as well as other guest appearances from Calexico and Iron and Wine’s Sam Beam.
Williams’ new set, Blessed, hit stores this past March, and blends her Americana mix of rock, blues and country into another landmark album for the performer; recently married, she’s entering another chapter in her life both musically and personally, as well.
Both of these musicians, now on the road for a July tour, will be appearing - together - at Interlochen this month for a show that’s sure to be a standout.

AMOS LEE
Singer-songwriter and guitarist Lee is now on his fourth album on Blue Note Records, and this tour with Williams isn’t his first trip around the block.
The dusky-voiced, blazer-wearing, mysteriously-named musician (no one’s quite sure exactly where his “Amos Lee” moniker came from) and former elementary-school teacher has also shared the stage with such performers as Norah Jones, Paul Simon, Dave Matthews Band, Bob Dylan, and Adele, bringing along his own drummer, Fred Berman, and his bassist Jaron Olevsky.
Blending folk with jazz and soul, Lee’s Philly influences can be heard throughout his songs, from his debut self-produced EP, which initially caught the attention of Jones, through Mission Bell’s “acoustic soul” effort. He’s another artist whose songs have proved to be evocative enough to serve as score for a wide variety of media, from his songs’ appearances in Studio 60, Army Wives, Grey’s Anatomy, and ER to movies like Just Like Heaven and even an AT&T commercial that proved to be a fan favorite.

LUCINDA WILLIAMS
Meanwhile, Williams - she of the Chrissie Hynde eyeliner, truck-stop waitress hair, and distinctive vocal stylings - has a few years on Lee, having recorded her first album back in 1978.
Although a sophomore album followed in 1980, she first really gained attention as a songwriter when Mary Chapin Carpenter recorded a cover of Williams’ song “Passionate Kisses.” The result? Williams was awarded a songwriter Grammy for Best Country Song, which helped boost her success.
A critic’s favorite, Williams has also been noted as a favorite duet partner and even song topic, first for Steve Earle (she sang with him on his song “You’re Still Standin’ There) and then for Vic Chestnutt, who had a song titled “Lucinda Williams” on one of his albums.
1998 was finally a breaking point for Williams’ own songs, as her album Car Wheels on a Gravel Road snagged her a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album (bolstered by the inclusion of one of her songs in the Robert Redford movie The Horse Whisperer.) She’d go on to collaborate with the likes of Ryan Adams, Flogging Molly, Elvis Costello, and, of course Amos Lee.
Now settled in Nashville, she still keeps out of the loop to some degree, but keeps crafting music on a regular basis, both as a collaborator and as a solo artist; Blessed features a personal range of complex emotions and tales.

AMOS, MEET LUCINDA
Elusiveness is one thing these two performers have in common, but another more important element is their shared penchant for earnest, earthy music that showcases the best elements of their individual approaches to songs that tell emotional stories and keep both performers and fans grounded.
Lee’s headlining spring tour, which included a stop at Bonnaroo and one at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, will segue right into his dates with Williams, who guested on Lee’s new album. It’s anyone’s guess whether she’ll also step out on stage for that critically-acclaimed duet, but one thing fans can be sure of is another great Interlochen show from these two seasoned performers.

Lucinda Williams and Amos Lee will be performing in concert at Interlochen on July 13 at 8:00 p.m.; tix available online via http://tickets.interlochen.org.

 
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