Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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20 Years of Celebrating Nature: Raven Hill Discovery Center

Kristi Kates - August 29th, 2011
20 Years of Celebrating Nature: Raven Hill Discovery Center
By Kristi Kates
It‘s difficult to believe that Raven Hill Discovery Center has been around for 20 years. The Center in East Jordan is one of those places intrinsic to Northern Michigan; it just seems like it‘s always been there, yet it manages to stay fresh and find new ways to introduce visitors to new discoveries.
Celebrating their 20th anniversary this year, co-founder Cheri Leach (with Tim Leach) explains how Raven Hill Discovery Center has evolved.

“Since 1991, Raven Hill‘s focus on connections have strengthened,“ Leach says. “Visitors experience the strands of science and technology, culture, history, and the arts interwoven throughout the Center‘s hands-on exhibits and displays.“
Over the past 20 years the Center has added five outbuildings and six major outdoor exhibits.
“Current facilities include the main museum, fiber studio, print shop, ARt Pavilion, school house, alternative energy house, and tree house,“ Leach says. “Our outdoor exhibits range from a half-acre pond and medicinal gardens to The Ancient World, the labyrinth, wetlands boardwalk, the Earth Tones Music Garden, the Taxonomic Trail with trees grouped by families, ‘Art and Architecture in Smallville,‘ and ‘Beyond Jurassic Park: The Earth‘s Geologic History.‘ Programs change with the seasons.“

MUSEUMS AND CRITTERS
With so many offering, it might be a little tricky choosing what to start with at the Center. Leach suggests the hands-on areas, and visiting some of Raven Hill Discovery Center‘s ‘residents.‘
“Visitors enjoy the hands-on museum indoors, and the Earth Tones Music Garden outside,“ she says. “The average indoor visit is a couple of hours; most visitors explore indoors and then move to the outdoor exhibits, depending on the weather. When it‘s really hot, the outdoors is popular early in the morning, and then the indoors is a cool retreat in the afternoon. Some bring a picnic lunch and stay all day.“
The animals are the other most popular attraction, “especially Sheldon the tortoise and Checkers the corn snake,“ Leach smiles. Sheldon, the African spurred tortoise, is another favorite. The Center is, in part, also an orphanage.
“We take in animals that people buy at pet stores and eventually don‘t want any more,“ Leach says. “So we try to educate people about what makes a good pet, and encourage them to visit the snakes, lizards, and turtles here.“
“We also do not keep any Michigan animals,“ she continues, “Michigan protects its animals, and there is a fine for catching and keeping Michigan reptiles or amphibians or fish in your homes, so we don‘t keep them here. Even though we have the proper permits, it just sends the wrong message.“

PROGRAMS AND CLASSES
On weekends and during the summer, the Center is popular with the public exploring the grounds and buildings. Field trips, teachers completing work for graduate credits, and outreach programs round out the schedule.
“Raven Hill was recognized as a Crooked Tree Arts Center eddi Award recipient for Arts and Cultural Organizations,“ Leach says, “and has also garnered 11 consecutive grant awards from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.“
Until Labor Day, the Center is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Once winter arrives, the center is still open on weekends (noon to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays, and 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Sundays), and Leach says they often add extra days over holiday breaks. Classes are also offered year-round.
The Center also offers over 90 classes, Leach says. “Some of the most popular are learning to make hot glass beads, polishing fossils, and learning survival skills.“
Classes are scheduled by request. “Participants can call and tell us what class they want, the day they want, and the time they want, and most of the time we can accommodate them.“
Special events during the fall and winter include a new astronomy event on September 22 celebrating the Fall Equinox, the Winter Equinox on December 21, and the center‘s annual Holiday Open House, “which is always December 28th,“ Leach says.

FUTURE AND FUNDING
The future looks bright for Raven Hill Discover Center, especially with the addition of astronomy expert Bryan Shumaker.
“Bryan and his wife, Linda, recently retired to Northern Michigan,“ Leach explains, “Bryan was director of Oakland University‘s Astronomy Observatory, and he will share his enthusiasm about astronomy and telescopes, plus his plans for an Astronomy Club, during our September 22 event. The Center actually has one of the best observing sites in all of Michigan with a dark sky and low horizons.“
Raven Hill‘s ‘Beyond Jurassic Park‘ outdoor exhibit is expanding, as well, with the addition of a ‘Coral Reef‘ that will feature artistic interpretations of prehistoric creatures that lived in the shallow seas that covered Michigan 450 milion years ago, including the famed ‘Petoskey Stones.‘
Also in the works - a Time Tunnel that the center hopes to build next year; but that one might be up to you.
“The Center is looking for grants and donations for that project,“ Leach says, “it will be a long, narrow exhibit that will have ‘timelines‘ that will highlight the changes over time in buttons, toys, cameras, irons, typewriters, calculators, washing machines, and other aspects of our daily lives. Visitors will be able to stop at 1650 to see what people were using, then, for example, move back to 1250 or forward to 1950.“
Raven Hill Discovery Center is actually always looking for support, Leach says. Their biggest need right now is more space.
“It would be nice to not have to keep ‘morphing‘ the print shop into a glass studio or wood shop,“ she says.
Those interested can contact the center to help, learn more about the Center itself, or make plans to visit; the Center is fortunate in that it‘s already so well-done, it‘s likely to inspire donations and help from its visitors for another 20 years.

*Raven Hill Discovery Center is located at 04737 Fuller Road in East Jordan, telephone 231-536-3369 (toll-free 877-833-4254); more info can be found online at www.ravenhilldiscoverycenter.org.*

 
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