Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · This Old House Benefit...
. . . .

This Old House Benefit planned for Old Mission landmark

- July 25th, 2011
This Old House Benefit planned for Old Mission landmark
Things are generally pretty quiet at the Old Mission House, which reflects
on 169 years of history, dating back to the earliest days of white
settlement in the Grand Traverse area.
The home at 18459 Mission Road on Mission Peninsula is in fact the oldest
wood frame house in the greater Grand Traverse region. Supporters and
local history buffs hope to give the aging landmark a spruce-up with the
help of a fundraiser on Thursday, Aug. 4 at the Jolly Pumpkin restaurant.
The home was built by the Reverend Peter Dougherty, a Presbyterian
minister and graduate of the Princeton Seminary School, who established a
mission in 1839 in what is now the village of Old Mission. Initially, he
built a log church and school house for his work with the Odawa tribe of
Native Americans. In 1842, needing a larger, more permanent residence,
Dougherty built his “Mission House,” or manse.
“Dougherty stayed here for more than a decade teaching and farming as the
region grew and saw white settlers begin to inhabit the area,” states a
release from the Peter Dougherty Society.
“It was Peter Dougherty who planted the first cherry tree in the Traverse
City area in 1852, establishing the cherry industry in the wake of the
lumber era.
“In the early 1850s, Reverend Dougherty and his Native American and white
followers purchased land near what is now Omena in Leelanau County
relocating to what became called the ‘New Mission‘... The house saw
another significant period when Solon Rushmore purchased the homestead in
1861 and began farming. The Rushmore family began using the large house as
an inn in 1876 and, along with several other local hotel owners, was
pivotal in creating a resort industry on the Old Mission Peninsula.”
In 2006, The Grand Traverse Land Conservancy, working with the Dougherty
Historic Home Committee, purchased the house and the adjoining 16 acres
and assigned the property at closing to Peninsula Township. The society in
conjunction with the township, has been working since that time to
rehabilitate the house and outbuildings to create a historical,
educational and cultural center to interpret the history of Peter
Dougherty and the history of the Old Mission Peninsula.”
All told, the Old Mission House is perhaps the most
historically-significant building in the region, considering its roots in
settlement, the cherry industry and tourism. Members of the Peter
Dougherty Society hope to preserve and cherish its tradition.

The Society’s fundraiser will be at the Jolly Pumpkin, 13512 Peninsula
Drive on Thursday, August 4. Tickets are $45 from Peninsula Market.
For more info see http://www.peterdoughertysociety.org
 
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