Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Rare Earths Our technological...
. . . .

Rare Earths Our technological vulnerability

- July 25th, 2011
Rare Earths: Our technological vulnerability
Remember this poem from your school days? “For the want of a nail, a shoe
was lost/ For the want of a shoe, a horse was lost/ For the want of a
horse, a rider was lost/ For the want of a rider, a message was lost/ For
the want of a message, a battle was lost/ For the want of a battle, a
country was lost/ For the want of a nail.”
This situation has been repeated again and again and is still happening.
In World War II with the German steel factories turning out weapons for
the Nazi forces, an insurance specialist was called in by the Allies to
identify the weak link in the German military production. The simple
solution was this: German steel manufacturing demanded sulfuric acid. The
source was a single plant in southern Germany and the acid was produced in
ceramic vats. All that was needed was for a spy saboteur to take a hammer
to the acid vats and break them. This was done and German steel production
was set back for months until new ceramic vats could be made.
During the Vietnam War when the primary infantry weapon was the M16 rifle,
the ammunition was produced in one factory in East Alton, Illinois. As the
story goes, one day a carpenter moved an electrician’s cable. Carpenters
weren’t supposed to touch electricians’ stuff, and there was a strike that
shut down the production of the M16 ammunition. In a short time the troops
in Vietnam were running out of ammunition, and the government had to see
that a couple more factories were contracted to make more ammunition, even
after the strike ended, all because of a minor labor dispute.
I learned that only one company in the country made brushes for electric
motors, If they went out of production that would stop all companies from
building electric motors.

JAPAN & PAINT
Today, because of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, a key ingredient
for U.S. auto production is no longer available. It is pigment for the
paint used in auto production. That is the weak link.
More sinister is this one: five state-of-the art foundries were built in
Michigan for the manufacture of windmills to generate electricity. You may
have seen some of those massive constructions. They are as tall as 300
feet, like a 30-story building, but the key part is the generator that
makes the electricity. It’s a small unit, but the construction of the
generators requires rare earth.
Rare earths are mineral substances that are hard to find with names like
Yttrium, Praseodymium, Samerium, Europium, Erbium and Promethium. Many
are used for the construction of lasers (Dysprosium, Holmium, Erbium,
Ytterbium, etc.). Need a nuclear battery? Then you’ll need the rare
earth Promethium to build one. Aerospace aluminum, rare earth magnets,
vanadium steel and many other technologically-advanced materials and
products all rely on rare earths (ie., Scandium Dysprosium, Erbium).
In the case of Michigan’s windmill generators, the one mine in America
that produced the rare earth needed for a key part was closed because a
Chinese source was more plentiful. Ah, but the Chinese also build
windmills and they have announced that they are curtailing export of the
essential rare earths. As a result, the five Michigan foundries are closed
down, and China is on the way to cornering the world windmill production.

THE HELIUM MARKET
The United States did something similar to Germans in the days of the
Hindenberg and other lighter-than-air ships of the 1930s. The U.S. is
the world’s source for helium and would not sell it to the
technologically-advanced Germans, so they were forced to substitute
flammable hydrogen for their dirigibles. Result: poof! The fiery crash
of the Hindenberg at Lakehurst, New Jersey in 1937 was the death knell
for airships. That was in spite of a flawless record of the Graf
Zeppelin in making more than 70 trips from Germany to South America.
The future of an industry -- even of a country -- can depend on a
single vulnerable element, even if it is as simple as a horseshoe nail.
For the want of a nail.

Visit the web site www.hu.mtu.edu/~hlsachs where you can listen to two
stories, read a third, read reviews, and find links to the publishers of
my books.
 
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