Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · The Decemberists Kings of Their...
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The Decemberists Kings of Their Stage

Kristi Kates - July 25th, 2011
The Decemberists Kings of Their Stage
By Kristi Kates
Indie folk-rockers The Decemberists aren’t your typical West Coast hipster band. Fusing their ambitious, complex songs with everything from historical happenings to old wives’ tales and lore borrowed from sea shanties, a live Decemberists show might find the audience doing everything from singing along to watching a quirky reenactment of a ship battle to being told to “scream as if they were being eaten by a whale.”
It’s all just part of The Decemberists’ colorful stage show, which also finds the audience doing a whole lot of applauding.

SIMPLE SPACES
Much of that applause will likely be for the tuneful tracks from The Decemberists’ sixth full-length album, The King is Dead, which was released this past January on Capitol Records. The King is Dead serves as the complex follow-up to the band’s 2009 hit set, The Hazards of Love, a romantic collection of tracks inspired by Old English folk music.
Their latest songs are a little more grounded in today’s realities, in part spurred by frontman Colin Meloy’s move to a more rural neighborhood, away from the band’s homebase of Portland, Oregon.
Spare, acoustic arrangements and more of an Americana, country feel infuse The King is Dead - an approach that actually better serves to showcase the talents of songwriter Meloy and his bandmates, Chris Funk, Nate Query, John Moen, and Jenny Conlee.
“It’s a real challenge to make simple music,” Meloy says, “and a lot of times we had to deliberately hold off and keep more space. This record is an exercise in restraint.”

RURAL PLACES
Echoing the sounds of the sorts of music festivals heard in small barns and across large farmer’s fields, the album’s musical theme also inspired Meloy and crew to bring in a couple of guest stars, one who fit perfectly in to this particular album’s mindset - namely Gillian Welch, who sings on most of the album’s songs - and another, R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck, who served as more of a reminder of The Decemberists’ own cult status as indie-rockers who were, in turn, influenced by R.E.M.’s music.
Welch was chosen as a female foil to Meloy’s own singing, a paean to some of his own favorite country-rock records that paired up male and female singers, while Buck was snagged through the band’s connection to Robyn Hitchcock; Buck contributes guitar to two songs, as well as playing mandolin on the striking “Don’t Carry It All.”
Actually recorded in a converted barn that’s home to an annual “Pickathon” indie roots music festival just outside of Portland, The King is Dead includes even more Americana sounds, from Funk’s pedal-steel guitar to guest Annalisa Tornfelt’s fiddle work. But don’t fear, Decemberists fans - it’s still solidly a Decemberists album, even with all of these farm-fresh influences. The songwriting, the performances, and Meloy’s distinctive vocals are all intact and quite recognizable.
“The syntax of The Decemberists is definitely still there,” assures Meloy.

The Decemberists perform at Interlochen on Wednesday, July 27 at 8 p.m. Tix at https://tickets.interlochen.org/
 
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