Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · What I‘ll miss
. . . .

What I‘ll miss

Brooke Whitten - August 8th, 2011
What I‘ll Miss ...going back to school
By Brooke Whitten
As August arrives, I’m forced to pack my belongings into boxes and
suitcases for a third time. I’m getting ready to start my junior year at
Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant. I’m only four semesters
away from graduating with a major in photojournalism and minor in outdoor
and environmental education.
As some college students might agree, shoving possessions into boxes gets
a little bit easier each time. It’s a routine we are forced to become
accustomed to. What I am never quite prepared for however, is saying “see
you later” to the place that I was fortunate enough to have been born and
raised in, Northern Michigan.
There is no place I would rather be, especially in the summertime. What
is difficult to come to terms with is the fact that I really did not
appreciate this place until I left. Mount Pleasant is about as flat as you
can get, and pretty dry when it comes to the water situation.
What I am going to miss about Northern Michigan spreads from Empire to
Lake Leelanau; from the little shops in Glen Arbor, to the Grocer’s
Daughter chocolates near Crystal Lake, Cedar’s Blue Moon Ice Cream Shop
and not to mention Pleva’s hotdogs. Those are the only dogs I’ll eat,
besides an occasional brat, but only if it’s cooked with a stick over a
campfire. North Bar Lake and Leland will be on my mind, along with
Fishtown and Suttons Bay.
Recreation in Northern Michigan brings my feet back to the ground,
clearing my head of any negative connotation or emotion. A reassuring hike
reminds me that there are still good things in this world and that there
is still so much world to be seen and walked on. It makes me feel small,
and my problems even smaller.
Stormer Road in Empire leads past a farmhouse with a giant red barn.
Across from the barn there is a trail that escorts you into the woods. As
you hike, you are overcome with the sweet smell of leeks and fresh air.
From the forest you’ll see an old barn and what looks like a domed cellar
that was built into the side of a grass-covered mound. Past the cellar,
which is a wonderful spot for sunbathing, resting and chats with fellow
hikers, you enter a field surrounded by tree-covered hills. There is a
narrow pathway overcome by grass, weeds and little critters such as
grasshoppers and bumblebees.
While making your way through the field, there is a slender sand path that
makes for an awesome workout. You climb straight up and around a few turns
through tall trees and roots in the trail. At the top of the climb you
realize the trudge was all worth the shortness of breath and sweat.
The view is Lake Michigan. So big and blue, it’s like it has been sitting
there waiting for you to arrive. We don’t have bluffs, much less hills,
where I am going.
I’ll miss the pleasure of sitting on top of a hill with a few friends,
absorbing the sunset over Lake Michigan. What’s stunning about Northern
Michigan is the array of places to sit and watch a sunset. So many choices
and different grounds to explore, I always wonder why I even left this
place.
One could say Northern Michigan’s terrain has shaped me into who I am.
It’s never easy saying goodbye, however reassuring that this is my home,
our home. I’ll be back.

 
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