Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Bird‘s eye view/Aerial...
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Bird‘s eye view/Aerial photography

Glen Young - August 8th, 2011
Bird’s eye view: Aerial photography exhibit soars in Petoskey
By Glen Young
Robert Cameron always took the bird’s eye view. Cameron, whose works are
currently on display at Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center gallery,
popularized the aerial vantage point in his many “Above” books. His
first, “Above San Francisco,” was published in 1969. He went on to
publish 16 more in the series. There are more than three million “Above”
books in print.
Cameron, a native of Des Moines, Iowa who died in 2009 at age 98, first
made a name in publishing in 1964 with his book “The Drinking Man’s Diet,”
which promoted the notion that a martini or a Scotch during meals could
help take off weight. He sold more than 2.4 million copies of the popular
diet book. Forbes Magazine said recently, “Then and now, the diet is work
of staggering brilliance.”
The Crooked Tree exhibit features 15 of Cameron’s “Above” photos, some as
close to home as Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel and surrounding
neighborhood, while some are more far flung, such as France’s Mont St.
Michel. Loaned by Cameron’s daughter and son-in-law, Jane and Richard
Manoogian, the works are a composite both of Cameron’s vision, as well as
his adherence to the belief that photos be shot on a grand scale.
Curator Gail DeMeyere purposely hung the photos lower than she typically
hangs art, in order to give viewers a sense of walking into the scene.

BEGINNINGS
Given his first camera, a Brownie 1A, on his 10th birthday, Cameron
eventually made his way to the Des Moines Register, where he worked
through the Depression, earning $14 a week for his efforts behind the
lens. He worked as a civilian photographer for the War Department during
World War II, as his health kept him from active duty.
Later he took a job selling perfume in New York, which he abhorred. In
1959, he announced to his family his desire to move to San Francisco. The
family moved the next year, and Cameron set up Cameron and Company, which
first sold champagne-formula shampoo.
After the success of his “Drinking Man’s” book, he took to aerial
photography. “Above San Francisco” was his first publication. Other
titles include “Above Paris,” “Above Mexico City,” and “Above Yosemite,”
as well as several more. Each title features text by an authority on the
area. John F. Kennedy’s press secretary Pierre Salinger wrote the text
for “Above Paris.” Phil Porter, director of Mackinac State Historic
Parks, provided the text for “Above Mackinac.”
Porter says, “It was an honor and joy to work with Bob Cameron on his
book… By the time he did this publication, he was already a noted
aerial photographer, having produced stunning books on some of the
most famous and beautiful cities around the world.”
Cameron’s camera of choice was a Pentax 6x7 cm, which is about four times
larger than the standard 35 mm camera. The camera was hand-held, and
equipped with a gyrostabilizer. He used lenses that ranged from fisheye
to 400 mm. Usually hanging out of the open door, Cameron typically worked
from a Bell Jet Ranger helicopter. He was fond of saying, “I always
thought that aerial photography was a big and grand subject and ought to
be presented large.” Before his death, he did acknowledge the impact of
digital, though he always believed he could only do what he liked to do
with film. Cameron stayed busy taking aerial photos until only months
before his death.

BIG SHOTS
The 15 photographs on display at Crooked Tree range in size from 40
inches by 60 inches (The Golden Gate Bridge on its 50th anniversary), to 6
by 12 feet (The annual Taste of Chicago). Each photo was reframed in
22-karat gold leaf for this exhibition. The exhibit is the result of a
collaboration between Crooked Tree board member Melissa Keiswetter and the
Manoogians.
DeMeyere, visual arts and education director at Crooked Tree, says
visitors are connecting with the photographs in a variety of ways.
“People talk of their experiences traveling to these areas, or a desire to
travel to these areas,” she says.
Of the more recognizable scenes, such as Mackinac Island or Wall Street,
people are trying to find their homes or points of interest. Some of the
images create a vertigo feeling, especially the New York Skyscrapers, and
you feel as if you can fall into the image.”
Cameron and Company, which celebrates its 45th anniversary this year, also
publishes “Above” calendars, as well as other titles on subjects as
diverse as oyster culture, sculpture, and tea.

“Above: The Photography of Robert Cameron” will be on display at
Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center until September 5. For more
information, call 231-347-4337 or visit their website at
www.crookedtrree.org.


 
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