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Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


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Bird‘s eye view/Aerial photography

Glen Young - August 8th, 2011
Bird’s eye view: Aerial photography exhibit soars in Petoskey
By Glen Young
Robert Cameron always took the bird’s eye view. Cameron, whose works are
currently on display at Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center gallery,
popularized the aerial vantage point in his many “Above” books. His
first, “Above San Francisco,” was published in 1969. He went on to
publish 16 more in the series. There are more than three million “Above”
books in print.
Cameron, a native of Des Moines, Iowa who died in 2009 at age 98, first
made a name in publishing in 1964 with his book “The Drinking Man’s Diet,”
which promoted the notion that a martini or a Scotch during meals could
help take off weight. He sold more than 2.4 million copies of the popular
diet book. Forbes Magazine said recently, “Then and now, the diet is work
of staggering brilliance.”
The Crooked Tree exhibit features 15 of Cameron’s “Above” photos, some as
close to home as Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel and surrounding
neighborhood, while some are more far flung, such as France’s Mont St.
Michel. Loaned by Cameron’s daughter and son-in-law, Jane and Richard
Manoogian, the works are a composite both of Cameron’s vision, as well as
his adherence to the belief that photos be shot on a grand scale.
Curator Gail DeMeyere purposely hung the photos lower than she typically
hangs art, in order to give viewers a sense of walking into the scene.

BEGINNINGS
Given his first camera, a Brownie 1A, on his 10th birthday, Cameron
eventually made his way to the Des Moines Register, where he worked
through the Depression, earning $14 a week for his efforts behind the
lens. He worked as a civilian photographer for the War Department during
World War II, as his health kept him from active duty.
Later he took a job selling perfume in New York, which he abhorred. In
1959, he announced to his family his desire to move to San Francisco. The
family moved the next year, and Cameron set up Cameron and Company, which
first sold champagne-formula shampoo.
After the success of his “Drinking Man’s” book, he took to aerial
photography. “Above San Francisco” was his first publication. Other
titles include “Above Paris,” “Above Mexico City,” and “Above Yosemite,”
as well as several more. Each title features text by an authority on the
area. John F. Kennedy’s press secretary Pierre Salinger wrote the text
for “Above Paris.” Phil Porter, director of Mackinac State Historic
Parks, provided the text for “Above Mackinac.”
Porter says, “It was an honor and joy to work with Bob Cameron on his
book… By the time he did this publication, he was already a noted
aerial photographer, having produced stunning books on some of the
most famous and beautiful cities around the world.”
Cameron’s camera of choice was a Pentax 6x7 cm, which is about four times
larger than the standard 35 mm camera. The camera was hand-held, and
equipped with a gyrostabilizer. He used lenses that ranged from fisheye
to 400 mm. Usually hanging out of the open door, Cameron typically worked
from a Bell Jet Ranger helicopter. He was fond of saying, “I always
thought that aerial photography was a big and grand subject and ought to
be presented large.” Before his death, he did acknowledge the impact of
digital, though he always believed he could only do what he liked to do
with film. Cameron stayed busy taking aerial photos until only months
before his death.

BIG SHOTS
The 15 photographs on display at Crooked Tree range in size from 40
inches by 60 inches (The Golden Gate Bridge on its 50th anniversary), to 6
by 12 feet (The annual Taste of Chicago). Each photo was reframed in
22-karat gold leaf for this exhibition. The exhibit is the result of a
collaboration between Crooked Tree board member Melissa Keiswetter and the
Manoogians.
DeMeyere, visual arts and education director at Crooked Tree, says
visitors are connecting with the photographs in a variety of ways.
“People talk of their experiences traveling to these areas, or a desire to
travel to these areas,” she says.
Of the more recognizable scenes, such as Mackinac Island or Wall Street,
people are trying to find their homes or points of interest. Some of the
images create a vertigo feeling, especially the New York Skyscrapers, and
you feel as if you can fall into the image.”
Cameron and Company, which celebrates its 45th anniversary this year, also
publishes “Above” calendars, as well as other titles on subjects as
diverse as oyster culture, sculpture, and tea.

“Above: The Photography of Robert Cameron” will be on display at
Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center until September 5. For more
information, call 231-347-4337 or visit their website at
www.crookedtrree.org.


 
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