Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Colt Ford
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Colt Ford

Rick Coates - August 8th, 2011
The Rap on Colt Ford
By Rick Coates
Real country musicians have an edge and attitude. Just ask Colt Ford, the
Georgia-based former professional golfer turned country singer. Of course,
Ford has to have an attitude since his way doesn’t fit the corporate
profile Nashville looks for in today’s country superstars.
“Yeah you could say I am on the outside looking,” said Ford. “Country
music today is still using that big corporate model that was developed in
the ’80s where they tell you how to look, sound and what to do. There are
very few independent country artists that have much success. It is a very
corporate world with a few people making all the decisions.”
Ford is frustrated trying to find his place.
“I don’t want to be on the outside looking in but they (Nashville) have
left me no choice,” said Ford. “Now the Internet with YouTube, Facebook,
Twitter etc. has allowed a person like me to even exist. I have not been
able to have much radio airplay and that is frustrating when you look at
the fact that I have over two million downloads and 800,000 CDs sold
without ever having a song in the top 50. What I am doing goes against all
their rules in Nashville.”

Despite lack of radio support and full embrace from Nashville, Colt Ford
has built up legions of fans. Those fans will gather this Sunday (August
14) at the Southside Hideout in Buckley (at their outdoor festival
grounds) for a show that will feature seven acts including the newly
formed Kenny Olson Cartel with Paris Delane, Detroit country-rap crooner
JoCaine, and Northern Express Readers Choice Best New Band 12 Year
The challenge Ford has met has come as a result of being labeled a
“country rapper.” A title he does not like or feel is deserved.
“I don’t get the typecast. What I am doing has been a part of country
music going way back to Hank Sr. I didn’t create something new talking and
recitation records have been a part of country music since its inception
and certainly putting words together that rhyme has been a part of all
music forever,” said Ford. “All this started way before Colt Ford came
along, Bill Anderson never sang nothing, Big John, Johnny Cash, Jerry Reed
and Charlie Daniels all those guys if you listen closely to their stuff it
ain’t no different then what I am doing.”
But the “country-rap” moniker has followed the 300-pound singer and former
professional golfer since he traded his golf spikes and driver for cowboy
boots and a microphone.
“It is funny because I get called a country rapper because a lot of radio
won’t play me. It makes a lot of people throw up a red flag immediately
and not want to give my songs a fair listen. So if someone listens to my
music and says it’s not country then we have totally different definitions
of country music,” said Ford. “What I don’t get is I will go into a town
and sell a few thousand advance tickets and the local radio stations still
won’t play my stuff, have me on the air, and in some cases they won’t play
commercials promoting the show. I just don’t get it.”

Ford points to radio being corporate and air personalities lacking
“personality, creativity and the ability to think for themselves.
“The way I see it a lot of these people in radio today won’t have a job in
five years; they lack creativity, they are not introducing people to new
music, they are not finding out what is going on in their community, they
are just robots talking into a microphone,” said Ford. “So when they are
out of a job I will still have people coming to see me play because I have
fans that I have been loyal to them and they have been loyal to me. I am
not going to change who I am to fit their corporate expectations, I am
going to be who I am and most people want that real genuine artist and
they seem to be finding me without radio.”
That image started out first as a professional golfer.
“That was 100 pounds ago. I was athletic in high school and had college
scholarships for golf and baseball and I chose golf figuring I could make
a living at it. But I also grew up playing music,” said Ford. “I was
trying to do both golf and music at the same time and it was hard to do
both because with music I was going to bed about the time I would have to
get up for golf. They are totally different lifestyles.”
After finishing at the University of Georgia, Ford pursued a professional
career on the Nationwide Tour and giving lessons when he was not touring.
He was also half-heartedly keeping one foot in a music career.
“My wife finally told me I needed to pick one or the other, that I was
essentially doing both half ass,” said Ford. “So I decided to change to
music to see if that might work better for me.”
Ford had one problem: Jason Farris Brown.
“Yeah that was my birth name and my wife was saying I couldn’t become a
country singer using that name,” said Ford. “She said ‘you need to have
something cooler,’ and then she just spit out ‘like Colt Ford.’ It was the
coolest name I had ever heard.”
Colt Ford shrugs off the naysayers and just chuckles.
“Now anyone who knows me knows that Colt Ford is exactly who I am. I am
more comfortable in my skin now than I was ever before,” said Ford. “For
me it is all about the music, in the end I believe the music will win out,
put whatever labels you want on me but my fans know I am country music all
the way.”

Colt Ford will perform his hits “Cold Beer,” “Chicken & Biscuits,” and
“Country Thang,” Sunday August 14 at the Southside Hideout in Buckley.
Info and tickets: www.zunitickets.com or call Southside Hideout at
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