Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

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Random Thoughts

George Foster - March 28th, 2002
March Madness
Is anyone else confused about the verdicts in several high-profile cases decided lately?
When Robert Noel and Marjorie Knoller were convicted for the dog mauling of a Diane Whipple, it makes me wonder about our justice system.
Whipple‘s tragic death was probably avoidable and certainly the dog owners deserve punishment - but life imprisonment? No matter what you think about any display of cold-heartedness and negligence by the defendants, Whipple‘s death was a terrible accident. There is no evidence that Noel and Knoller ordered or allowed the dogs to attack anyone. Diane Whipple was not murdered.
On the other hand, Andrea Yates was convicted of murdering her five children and also received a life sentence. Is Marjorie Knoller‘s crime of inadequate pet control equal to Andrea Yates methodically drowning each of her children? I don‘t think anyone of sound mind can argue that Knoller‘s acts begin to approach the magnitude of Yates‘.
And how does Yates avoid capital punishment in Texas, a state that is known for frying the accused and asking questions later? Yates‘ mental state was not factored into her case, so the court concluded that Yates knew what she was doing during the crime.
If so, if anyone ever deserved the death penalty, it was Andrea Yates. Her case is one more example of why capital punishment should be banned. It never has been, nor will it ever be applied fairly.

The Pride of Petoskey.
On a lighter note, what a difference 15 years can make.
He was a nice kid but also the quiet one in a family of frequent communicators. He seemed mostly interested in playing cowboys and Indians though his father, brother, and uncle were all accomplished jocks at a young age.
Of course, the last time I saw Trevor Huffman he was only six or seven years old. These days he is often on national TV discussing his team‘s surprising rise to elite status in college basketball. Huffman is the star point guard for Kent State University, threatening to become the first Mid-American team to win an NCAA basketball title.
A graduate of Petoskey High School, Trevor Huffman may be one of the three most accomplished athletes ever to have origins in Northern Michigan - Dan Majerle of CMU/NBA fame and Mark Brammer at MSU and the NFL, the others. To put it mildly, he got game. Huffman definitely has a shot at making it in the NBA.
Talk about underdogs, the Kent State Golden Flashes are like no other prominent college basketball team in recent history. Until now, a university that is still known mostly for the tragic deaths of students shot in 1970 rather than sports, four of Kent‘s starters are 6‘3“ and under - Huffman is 6‘1“ and guard Andrew Mitchell is only 5‘11“. Squads this short would be towered over by many high school teams and are virtual midgets on the college level.
After impressive victories over Indiana last year and Alabama and Pittsburgh in this season‘s NCAA tournament, Kent State has proved they are for real. As we go to press, Kent State‘s tournament run has allowed them to join the final eight teams vying for the national championship. If Huffman can somehow propel Kent past Indiana again on March 23rd, a Final Four spot awaits this ultimate Cinderella team.
No matter what the outcome, Trevor Huffman has put Petoskey on the national map for the first time since... well, the discovery of the first Petoskey stone. Go Golden Flashes.




 
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