Letters

Letters 10-03-2016

Truths And Minorities While I appreciate Stephen Tuttle’s mention of the Colin Kaepernick situation, I was disappointed he wrote only of his right not to stand for the national anthem but not his reason for doing so. Personally, I commend Mr. Kaepernick for his courageous attempt to bring issues of concern to the forefront. As a white male baby boomer, I sadly realize I am in a minority among my peers...

“Yes” Means Your Rights It has been brought to my attention that some people in Traverse City are being asked to put “no” on Proposal 3 signs in their yards, and are falsely being told this means they do not want tall buildings downtown. Nothing could be further from the truth. If you vote no, you will be giving up your right to vote on future projects involving buildings over 60 feet in height...

Shame On NMC, Nelson The Northwestern Michigan College board and President Tim Nelson should be ashamed of their bad faith negotiations with the faculty. The faculty have received no raise this year, even though all other college staff have received raises. Mr. Nelson is set to receive a $20,000 raise...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Rolling out the New Betsie...
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Rolling out the New Betsie Valley Trail: Region‘s Newest Bike Trail will Connect to Michigan Network

Danielle Horvath - June 10th, 2004
Someday, the Betsie Valley Trail will connect to the Michigan Trailway System which is proposed to stretch over 1,000 miles across the state, creating a web of recreational trails that stretch from Lake Huron to Lake Michigan and from the south state line across the U.P.
A major section of the trail from Elberta to Beulah was paved last fall. When it is completed, the 22-mile piece in Benzie County will connect Thompsonville, Benzonia, Beulah, Frankfort and Elberta. Constructed on the former Ann Arbor Railroad Corridor, it passes around Betsie Bay, crosses through forests and parallels the Betsie River and Crystal Lake.
The project is a partnership project of Benzie County and the Department of Natural Resources. In 1993, the “Friends of Betsie Valley Trail” non-profit, volunteer group formed to encourage the development and operation of a recreational trail in Benzie County. They have been instrumental in generating support for the trail and in raising funds to build it. Other community groups, businesses and individuals have supported the project, from the Benzie Audubon Club, who erected a bird watching platform along the trail in Elberta, to families participating in the Adopt-A-Trail program which takes care of segments along the route.

ON A ROLL
Because of a lengthy court case, it took 10 years from the first meeting to the first pavement, laid in November 2000, to get the trail underway. The asphalt now extends seven miles from Elberta to Mollineaux Road west of Beulah, and then is gravel the next three miles along the segment in front of private homes east of Railroad Point along Crystal Lake. The court settlement case involving property owners along Crystal Lake requires a semi-soft material on the 2.5-mile stretch of the trail along the lake.
The next phase of the trail is the proposed 12-1/2 mile stretch that will connect Beulah to Thompsonville. Plans for trailheads in both Beulah and Thompsonville are underway. The proposed Beulah Trailhead and Visitors Center with bike racks, bathrooms, and parking space, would be located near the old railroad depot, behind the businesses in downtown Beulah. An MDOT grant request is pending and DNR lease agreement is being considered.
“It seems like such a simple concept; after all it’s just a trail, said Sean DuPerron, Betsie Valley Trailway manager, who works under the MSU Extension Office in Benzie County. “But it’s so much more than that. Trail management involves organizing and managing resources, being aware of requirements, keeping the public involved and informed, and much more.”

GET INVOLVED
DuPerron sees the trail as an integral part of the community, with a multitude of uses besides the many bikers, hikers, roller bladers and snowmobilers who use it. “It’s can be used to teach school groups about the local history of the area, particularly the railroads; it can be a tool for master gardeners to share knowledge about the flora and fauna of the area; it’s a chance to see the land from a unique and different perspective,” he explained.
Volunteers are always needed and much appreciated for tasks ranging from folding trail maps to clearing brush and promoting the trail through photography. Anyone interested may contact 231-882-9605 or email: betsievalleytrl@benzie.com.






 
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