Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo...
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Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo Sings of Peace in a Violent Land

Ross Boissoneau - March 10th, 2005
Whatever the song or the setting, the harmonies of Ladysmith Black Mambazo are instantly recognizable. Now you can hear for yourself Wednesday, March 16 when the acclaimed South African group performs at Interlochen Center for the Arts.
Whether it’s with Paul Simon, who first brought the a capella group to worldwide attention on the “Graceland” disc and tour, with harp player Andreas Vollenweider, or performing alongside an orchestra as on “No Boundaries,” their latest recording, the 10 member-group has created a sound and identity like no other.
That’s been recognized by audiences worldwide, as well as by the critics. As proof, the group just won the Grammy for Best Traditional World Music Album, their second Grammy, for “Raise Your Spirit Higher.”
“We are so grateful and proud to have been awarded the Grammy Award. It’s a humbling moment,” said group leader Joseph Shabalala, the founder of the world-renowned Zulu singing group. “The members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo and I accept this award, not just as recognition for our songs, but for our culture, our people and our country.”
It’s that attitude and spirit which pervades their music. Singer Albert Mazibuko, who’s shared the stage alongside his cousin for more than 30 years, exhibits the same gentleness and yearning for peace.
“We want to encourage people to work together,” Mazibuko said. “The music is South Africa striving for peace. If we sing of peace it will come out.”

DEATH IN THE FAMILY
That message of peace has been hard won. The group lived under the shadow of apartheid in its native country until the election of Nelson Mandela just a decade ago.
More recently, Shabalala’s wife Nellie was murdered by a masked gunman outside their church in South Africa in 2002. And last year, Shabalala’s brother Ben, a member of the group during the Paul Simon “Graceland” era, was shot and killed in Durban.
Despite these tragedies, the group remains committed to its message of peace and harmony.
Ladysmith has sung with numerous artists of all stripes: Stevie Wonder, Dolly Parton, the Corrs and others.
“It’s amazing. It’s so good to sing with all these people,” said Mazibuko. “It creates different feelings when you sing with different people. Music is a gift. When we come together we become one. It’s necessary.”
But his favorite remains the album and tour which brought Ladysmith Black Mamabazo and South African music in general to the attention of the U.S.
“My favorite is Paul Simon,” he said with a smile in his voice. “That tour stands out with me. It was so wonderful, and a great breakthrough.”
Mazibuko said the audience at Interlochen will hear a mix of the group’s music, including songs from “Raise Your Spirit Higher” and “No Boundaries” as well as numerous other songs from throughout the group’s history.
“We’re just bringing in some of the new material,” he said. “People can connect young and old. The young are innovative, the old have wisdom. You bring that together and it makes our world a peaceful place.
“That’s what we want to share with our audience.”
For ticket information call the Interlochen box office at 276-9222.

 
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