Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Music · Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo...
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Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo Sings of Peace in a Violent Land

Ross Boissoneau - March 10th, 2005
Whatever the song or the setting, the harmonies of Ladysmith Black Mambazo are instantly recognizable. Now you can hear for yourself Wednesday, March 16 when the acclaimed South African group performs at Interlochen Center for the Arts.
Whether it’s with Paul Simon, who first brought the a capella group to worldwide attention on the “Graceland” disc and tour, with harp player Andreas Vollenweider, or performing alongside an orchestra as on “No Boundaries,” their latest recording, the 10 member-group has created a sound and identity like no other.
That’s been recognized by audiences worldwide, as well as by the critics. As proof, the group just won the Grammy for Best Traditional World Music Album, their second Grammy, for “Raise Your Spirit Higher.”
“We are so grateful and proud to have been awarded the Grammy Award. It’s a humbling moment,” said group leader Joseph Shabalala, the founder of the world-renowned Zulu singing group. “The members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo and I accept this award, not just as recognition for our songs, but for our culture, our people and our country.”
It’s that attitude and spirit which pervades their music. Singer Albert Mazibuko, who’s shared the stage alongside his cousin for more than 30 years, exhibits the same gentleness and yearning for peace.
“We want to encourage people to work together,” Mazibuko said. “The music is South Africa striving for peace. If we sing of peace it will come out.”

DEATH IN THE FAMILY
That message of peace has been hard won. The group lived under the shadow of apartheid in its native country until the election of Nelson Mandela just a decade ago.
More recently, Shabalala’s wife Nellie was murdered by a masked gunman outside their church in South Africa in 2002. And last year, Shabalala’s brother Ben, a member of the group during the Paul Simon “Graceland” era, was shot and killed in Durban.
Despite these tragedies, the group remains committed to its message of peace and harmony.
Ladysmith has sung with numerous artists of all stripes: Stevie Wonder, Dolly Parton, the Corrs and others.
“It’s amazing. It’s so good to sing with all these people,” said Mazibuko. “It creates different feelings when you sing with different people. Music is a gift. When we come together we become one. It’s necessary.”
But his favorite remains the album and tour which brought Ladysmith Black Mamabazo and South African music in general to the attention of the U.S.
“My favorite is Paul Simon,” he said with a smile in his voice. “That tour stands out with me. It was so wonderful, and a great breakthrough.”
Mazibuko said the audience at Interlochen will hear a mix of the group’s music, including songs from “Raise Your Spirit Higher” and “No Boundaries” as well as numerous other songs from throughout the group’s history.
“We’re just bringing in some of the new material,” he said. “People can connect young and old. The young are innovative, the old have wisdom. You bring that together and it makes our world a peaceful place.
“That’s what we want to share with our audience.”
For ticket information call the Interlochen box office at 276-9222.

 
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