Letters

Letters 09-29-2014

Benishek Doesn’t Understand

Congressman Benishek claims to understand the needs of families, yet he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would cause about 10 million people to lose their health insurance. He must think as long as families can hold fundraisers they don’t need insurance...

(Un)Truth In Advertising

Constant political candidate ads on TV are getting to be too much to bear 45 days before the election...

Rare Tuttle Rebuttal

Finally, I disagree with Stephen Tuttle. His “Cherry Bomb” column in the 8/4/14 issue totally dismayed me. I always love his wit and the slamming of the 1 percent. His use of fact and hyperbole highlights the truth; until “Cherry Bomb.” Oh man, Stephen...

Say No To Fluoride

Do you or your child’s teeth have white, yellow, orange, brown, stains, spots, streaks, cloudy splotches or pitting? If so, you may be among millions of Americans who now have a condition called dental fluorosis...

Questions Of Freedom

The administration’s “Affordable Health Care Act” has ordered religious orders to provide contraception and chemical abortions against the church’s God given beliefs and teachings … an interesting order, considering the First Amendment’s clear prohibitions...

Stop The Insults & Talk

I found it interesting that Ms. Minervini used the Northern Express to push the Safe Harbor agenda for a 90-bed homeless shelter in Traverse City with a tactic that is also being utilized by members of the city commission. Those of us who oppose the project are being labeled as uncompassionate citizens...

Roads and Republicans

Each time you hit a road crater while driving, thank the “nerd” and the Tea Party controlled Republican legislature.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo...
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Zulu Rock: Ladysmith Black Mambazo Sings of Peace in a Violent Land

Ross Boissoneau - March 10th, 2005
Whatever the song or the setting, the harmonies of Ladysmith Black Mambazo are instantly recognizable. Now you can hear for yourself Wednesday, March 16 when the acclaimed South African group performs at Interlochen Center for the Arts.
Whether it’s with Paul Simon, who first brought the a capella group to worldwide attention on the “Graceland” disc and tour, with harp player Andreas Vollenweider, or performing alongside an orchestra as on “No Boundaries,” their latest recording, the 10 member-group has created a sound and identity like no other.
That’s been recognized by audiences worldwide, as well as by the critics. As proof, the group just won the Grammy for Best Traditional World Music Album, their second Grammy, for “Raise Your Spirit Higher.”
“We are so grateful and proud to have been awarded the Grammy Award. It’s a humbling moment,” said group leader Joseph Shabalala, the founder of the world-renowned Zulu singing group. “The members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo and I accept this award, not just as recognition for our songs, but for our culture, our people and our country.”
It’s that attitude and spirit which pervades their music. Singer Albert Mazibuko, who’s shared the stage alongside his cousin for more than 30 years, exhibits the same gentleness and yearning for peace.
“We want to encourage people to work together,” Mazibuko said. “The music is South Africa striving for peace. If we sing of peace it will come out.”

DEATH IN THE FAMILY
That message of peace has been hard won. The group lived under the shadow of apartheid in its native country until the election of Nelson Mandela just a decade ago.
More recently, Shabalala’s wife Nellie was murdered by a masked gunman outside their church in South Africa in 2002. And last year, Shabalala’s brother Ben, a member of the group during the Paul Simon “Graceland” era, was shot and killed in Durban.
Despite these tragedies, the group remains committed to its message of peace and harmony.
Ladysmith has sung with numerous artists of all stripes: Stevie Wonder, Dolly Parton, the Corrs and others.
“It’s amazing. It’s so good to sing with all these people,” said Mazibuko. “It creates different feelings when you sing with different people. Music is a gift. When we come together we become one. It’s necessary.”
But his favorite remains the album and tour which brought Ladysmith Black Mamabazo and South African music in general to the attention of the U.S.
“My favorite is Paul Simon,” he said with a smile in his voice. “That tour stands out with me. It was so wonderful, and a great breakthrough.”
Mazibuko said the audience at Interlochen will hear a mix of the group’s music, including songs from “Raise Your Spirit Higher” and “No Boundaries” as well as numerous other songs from throughout the group’s history.
“We’re just bringing in some of the new material,” he said. “People can connect young and old. The young are innovative, the old have wisdom. You bring that together and it makes our world a peaceful place.
“That’s what we want to share with our audience.”
For ticket information call the Interlochen box office at 276-9222.

 
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