Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

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Go Fish: New Studio Recycles a Warehouse for Live/Work Concept

Amy Yee - March 10th, 2005
Fish Studios, the newest concept for live/work spaces in Traverse City, is making a bit of a splash. Nestled between two railroad tracks just south of Old Town on Boardman Lake, this remodeled loft-style warehouse is now home to four creative businesses -- Priceless Photography, Sound/Design, Glenn Wolff Studio, and my own Amy Yee Design.
Located at 230 E. 14th Street, the studios were developed for artists and creative people. Using alternative materials such as corrugated metal, raw concrete flooring, rough stone countertops, translucent bathroom ceilings, and storefront window walls, the refurbished look fits in with the historic logger-railroad area. Spinning off the Soho art district in New York City, the new inhabitants have dubbed Fish Studios “the little Coho district.”
Breaking new ground with the vision of a live/work studio, architect Ken Richmond was ecstatic to find support from the city planning board which favored the idea of mixed-use cohabitation.
Zoned by the city especially for this type of use, the benefits of reusing an existing building along with environmental-friendly planning made good sense to city officials. The parking lot, made of green pervious material, allows storm water to filter back to the soil instead of stagnating. The studio use also curtails traffic and gasoline consumption, and helps build a collaborative community. Given the historic appeal of the renovated building and its central location, the tenants are excited to be part of the project.
To celebrate the building’s completion and opening to the public, Fish Studios will host an Open House on Saturday, March 12 from 4-8 p.m. for a bite of hors d’ouvres, a splash of drinks, and a four-studio tour.

STUDIO A -- Sound / Design
David Elmgren, the force behind Sound/ Design, grew up loving music and electronics as much as his father did. Seemingly always either building something or tearing something apart, he got his rudimentary education in electronic circuits when he was 16, helping his father build a Heathkit stereo system. Listening to Steppenwolf and Ten Years After on that stereo sowed the seeds of what was to become a life-long passion for music.
After a 20-year career as an artist and part-time architect’s draftsman and designer, Elmgren found an unlikely opening to fulfill his love of music and electronics. An architect he was working with needed a whole-house sound system for one of his clients and asked if it was something Elmgren would be interested in putting together. It opened the door for him to start what is now Sound / Design.
Elmgren offers audio/video products, design and installation and can be reached at (231) 947-4755 or soundesign@charter.net.

STUDIO B -- Priceless Photography
Born and raised in Traverse City, Elizabeth Price attended Michigan State University for three years before heading west to the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California. There, she obtained a bachelor’s degree in photography and honed her skills as a photographer.
An adventurous spirit led Price to go on a BIP sponsored trip to the Mekong River in Southeast Asia. She, along with 20 other students and a professor, spread out and spent three and a half months documenting the people and life along the Mekong. Each student had a focus, and Price chose to explore the human impact on a river shared by seven countries.
Relocating back to Michigan from California in 2003, Price brings a fresh style and professional, photographic experience to northern Michigan with Priceless Photography, Inc. She also works freelance for Grand Traverse Woman magazine and was published in the spring 2005 edition of Modern Bride Michigan. She plans to continue her environmental photography on a freelance basis. She can be contacted at 231-883-9384 or Elizabeth@pricelessphotography.com.

STUDIO C -- Amy Yee Design
With 23 years in advertising and 10 years as an entrepreneurial graphic designer, Amy Yee realizes the value in enjoying what she does for a living. Her new studio space at Fish Studios allows her to work -- and live -- creatively, efficiently, and doing what she loves. Yee produces designs for corporate identity packages, marketing and promotional material, publications, packaging, and signage. Local clients include the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, the Grand Traverse Pavilions, the City Opera House, Ravenwood Aromatherapy Products, and the Healing Garden Journal.
Starting in the trenches as a mailclerk at the corporate advertising agency, D’Arcy McManus Masius, Yee got a closeup look at the creativity that goes into great advertising design. Her creative endeavors fueled, she worked in typesetting and art production for agencies and studios in metro Detroit. After moving to Traverse City in 1990, she completed the Visual Communications program at Northwestern Michigan College.
For inquiries about Amy Yee Design, call 231-933-5366 or email amyyee@traverse.net.

STUDIO D -- Glenn Wolff Studio
Glenn Wolff grew up in Traverse City, studied printmaking at Northwestern Michigan College, and received his BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1975. His career path as an illustrator led him to New York City in the 1980s where his clients included the New York Times, Sports Illustrated, The Village Voice, The Central Park Conservancy, The New York Zoological Society and numerous book publishers.
In the 17 years since he returned to Northern Michigan he has been a much sought-after illustrator, collaborating with author Jerry Dennis and others including Robert Sullivan, John Gierach, and Stephanie Mills. His career has also grown to include fine art represented by the Tamarack Gallery, artist-in-residencies for the North American Prairie Conference, The Great Lakes Bioneers Conference, the Watershed Suite Project, Wings of Wonder, and music -- as upright bassist for the Neptune Quartet.
Open by appointment, the Glenn Wolff Studio will serve as a show room, and working studio for his private commission work, limited edition prints, and illustration studio. Call 231-941-0077, visit www.glennwolff.com or email GlennWolff@sbcglobal.net


 
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