Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - April 28th, 2005
Turtle Island String Quartet with Ying Quartet – 4 + Four – Telarc
Traverse City favorites TISQ have long been esteemed as the world’s top – all right, pretty much only – jazz-based string quartet. Here the group teams up with the Ying Quartet, a nearly-as-famous set of classical string players. The results are engaging at times, but generally rooted more in the classical tradition than the jazzy territory TISQ is known for. Turtle Island leader David Balakrishnan’s “Mara’s Garden of False Delights” is precise and amelodic enough that it could be by that other vanguard of string quartet originality, Kronos. “Variations on an Unoriginal Theme” is a jaunty treat that veers back and forth from Appalachian-style fiddling to European classicism. Uneven though it is, “4+Four” will grow on the listener, but it’s at odds with the best of Turtle Island.

Keren Ann – Nolita – Metro Blue
Keren Ann Zeidel’s unique alt-pop melds folksy guitars and French cabarets. Her breathy vocal style will probably turn some people off, but her singing with herself on such tracks as “Roses and Hips” complements her odd guitar harmonies and the harmonica of Jean-Jacques Milteau. Elsewhere celebrated jazz bassist Avishai Cohen plays trumpet on the title track, and Karen Brunon’s multi-tracked violins approximate a outré quartet sound. The story narration on “Song of Alice” is a bit much, but again, that criticism could apply to pretty much any song on “Nolita” and yet, it’s still full of charms. Keren Ann combines her voice with her guitar and keyboards to craft an album that is pretentious, over-the-top dramatic, and ultimately enjoyable.

Bela Fleck – Drive – Mobile Fidelity
Before there were the Flecktones, banjoist Bela Fleck was a bluegrass original. With an all-star cast of Sam Bush (mandolin), Jerry Douglas (dobro), Mark O’Connor (fiddle) and Tony Rice (guitar), among others, Fleck set out to make the ultimate acoustic bluegrass project. One listen to this amazing disc tells you how well he and his hand-picked group succeeded. Like Dixieland music, bluegrass always seems like great fun for the musicians to play, but that doesn’t always translate to the audience, especially an audience not particularly enamored of that style. “Drive” is one of those rare exceptions. No matter your musical predilections, it’s almost impossible to listen to this music without loving it. The moving melodic lines, uncanny interplay among the musicians involved, the pristine sound quality, and the quality of the music itself (all Fleck originals but one) make this a nonpareil album.

Steve Hackett – Metamorpheus – Inside Out America

Hackett certainly took his time with the follow-up to “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” That recording was a Top 10 album on the classical charts eight years ago. Hackett proved with that album that his orchestral writing was every bit as accomplished as his guitar playing, but while “Metamorpheus” lacks that element of surprise, it’s a grand, ambitious work that tells the musical story of Orpheus’s music and his love for Eurydice. The orchestral writing is superb once again, with even more drama. The featured orchestral soloists are uniformly excellent, and Hackett has seldom sounded so good. Perhaps one criticism is that Hackett elected not to pair the orchestra with his electric guitar, but that’s a minor criticism. When a recording works as well as “Metamorpheus” does, there’s really little to quibble about.






 
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