Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Technology... Electronic Waste
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Technology... Electronic Waste

Harley Sachs - May 26th, 2005
The true cost of any product must include the price of preventing or correcting environmental damage. Here in the Copper Country of the Upper Peninsula we live amidst the stamp sand residue of copper mining that took place in the last millennium. But in today’s climate of instant obsolescence there are new hazards: hazards that accumulate in our own households.
Computers seem to be obsolete the day after we buy them. Our household currently has six in two locations. My original 64k CPM computer that cost me $2,700 back in 1983 was soon superceded and when it died it went into the town dumpster. That’s not the best place for electronic waste.

TOXIC METALS
Electronic waste includes lead, mercury, nickel, cadnium, and other metals. I was shocked to learn, for instance, that the mercury in an old fever thermometer is enough to poison an entire small lake. But consider the tons of old television sets, computers, printers, copiers, fax machines, microwave ovens, stereo equipment, VCR and DVD players, cellular phones and batteries and their impact if they are simply dumped into our landfills to contaminate the ground water and the environment.
The awareness that her own home included “a ton of electronic waste” helped inspire Barb Maronen to do something about it. She learned that the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality was soliciting grant proposals. She applied for and got a $40,000 two-year grant for recycling electronic equipment in five Upper Peninsula counties.
In the past, people were encouraged to drop off electronics in working order at the Good Will, but nowadays who wants a slow computer with only 4 megs of RAM and 16 bit technology for which there is no existing software?

ONE TOWN’S SOLUTION
Two recycling dates were set up, one in the spring and one in the fall. The spring collection of household electronic waste took place at a health district building in Hancock. There, barely sheltered from a chilly rain, volunteers weighed, priced, and collected tons of stuff. The parking lot was full. The recycled equipment was bound for Marquette’s “Star Industries” and Interstate Battery.
Recycling wasn’t free. Most electronics were charged 15 cents a pound, but TVs and computer monitors, which hold between four and six pounds of lead apiece, cost 20 cents a pound to recycle. That, thanks to the grant, is half the actual cost.
My old Epson printer, 11 pounds, cost me $1.65 to get rid of. Cheap printers are built to last about a year and are sometimes priced below the cost of the ink cartridges needed to refill them. It can be cheaper to throw the old printer away when the ink is used up. But when the printer is replaced, then what? My non-operating Epson 640 joined pallets stacked high with keyboards, dead or obsolete computers, the detritus of an affluent society in continuous upgrade.
A FRACTION
This collection is only a fraction of what’s out there. Every time I visit the computer lab at Michigan Technological University I find a new generation of computers and monitors. Last year in the hallway I found a pile of discarded printers. At the auction of old electronic gear a year or so ago there were rows of computers which were once top of the line and were then useful only for a few spare parts or for hobbyists willing to tinker.
My old Cromemco C-10 64k CPM computer is long gone, but I still have my 640k Compaq I “luggable” that cost me $1,700 new. It’s now a collector’s item and comes complete with a 40 meg hard drive. Compare it with my latest Compag laptop with a 40 gig hard drive and 240 megs of RAM advertised for only $399. By next year it will be obsolete, too, and ready for the next round of recycling.
Watching the rapid development of technology has been exciting, but one is easily dismayed at the prospect of those hidden toxic metals polluting our environment. Hats off to Barb Maronen and those volunteers for their fine work. Let’a hope other counties in Michigan follow suit and recycle dead and obsolete electronics.
 
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