Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Considerable Worth of *Present...
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The Considerable Worth of *Present Value*

Nancy Sundstrom - January 1st, 2004

The latest book from Sabin Willett (“The Betrayal,“ “The Deal“) reads very much like a “Bonfire of the Vanities“ for the new millennium. Small wonder, then, that he has earned comparisons to Tom Wolfe for his keen eye, satiric point of view and steadily-guided wordsmithing when it comes to turning a spotlight on early-21st-century sensibilities.
“Present Value“ is Willett‘s newest and best effort to date. The book fairly crackles with energy and wit, evoking not only the spirit of Wolfe, but also of Jonathan Franzen (“The Corrections“) and Kurt Andersen (“Turn of the Century“). On the back cover, alongside testimonials from Mario Cuomo and Ken Auletta, Andersen himself opines that “If you love to hate lawyers, psychotherapists, political correctness, suburban oppressiveness, Blackberrys, CEOs, and/or CFOs; if you have a taste for tales of corporate intrigue told from the inside out; or if you enjoy dead-on 21st century comedies of manners, then Present Value is your book.“ Well put, indeed.
This is the tale of power couple Fritz and Linda Brubaker, for whom a perfect marriage is at the crux of their have-it-all lifestyle. Gym-built and always impeccably groomed, Fritz is an executive at a Fortune 100 toy company, and Linda is a million-dollar-a-year corporate attorney. Their two privileged children attend private school close to their home in a tony Boston suburb, and the quartet summers on Nantucket Island. Luxury SUVs and high tech computers, cell phones, beepers and Blackberry PDAs all keep things humming along, until a fateful day when their cushy world gets turned upside down.
Before that, though, Willett gives the reader a headfirst plunge into the waters of the Brubaker‘s lifestyle by describing the process for retrieving “precious cargo,“ a.k.a. children:

“HEAT! The heat was steamy and suffocating, a humid pall that anticipated the dawn and left everyone a little sluggish, a little vulnerable. It was so hot that the day itself seemed dazed, as though it had got lost from July somehow, made a wrong turn off the calendar, then wandered fitfully in the ether until it stumbled into September. In the suburbs west of Boston that Monday morning, it was not autumn at all; there was no hint or whisper of New England charm to come, nothing of the crisp anticipation of a new school year. It was just a sizzler -- a white-sky mugging.
And in the car-pool lane at the Chaney School, it was Cairo at noontime. “Car-pool lane“ was one of the school‘s many charming euphemisms, for there wasn‘t much pooling evident. The fewer the kids, the bigger the vehicle. The SUVs idled in rank, pumping out pizza-oven blasts of superheated exhaust, inching forward toward the alcove, where each would discharge from seventy-eight cubic feet of cargo space its seven cubic feet of Precious Cargo.
At just after eight a.m., behind the wheel of his wife‘s forest-green 2001 Lincoln Navigator, Fritz Brubaker took his place at the back of the line. In front of the Navigator was a shiny black Chevrolet Yukon XL with a 2500 cc Vortex engine, its powerful air conditioner cooling Precious Cargo by means of an asphalt-melting heat transfer from the tailpipe. In front of the Yukon was a white Mercedes SUV; in front of the Mercedes a Suburban, in front of the Suburban a pearl-gray Range Rover, in front of the Range Rover an Audi A6 all-wheel-drive Quattro feeling smugly and environmentally righteous in this brigade of half-tracks, and in front of the Audi a line of seven-foot SUVs broken only once by a minivan that looked as though it were being held hostage.
They didn‘t wait impatiently, mind you -- they advanced smartly, even eagerly, the moment they could, but not impatiently. No impatience would be expressed as the SUV at the front of the line stopped at the alcove and the driver hopped down from the front seat; none as she (usually but not always, either Mom or the nanny) came around to the passenger side to unbelt the cargo with a cheery wave to the vehicle behind; none as she greeted the welcome teacher (this morning it was Mavis Potemkin, one of the team-teaching second-grade pair); certainly no one would express vehicular urgency as the parent straightened the Patagonia backpack on the child‘s shoulders (the backpack must be an approved backpack: while the $79.99 JanSport would do in a pinch, a good parent really ought to spring for the $109 Patagonia number); no one in line would be so gauche as to rev a three-hundred-horsepower engine as the parent checked the water bottle (children must be properly hydrated at all times); and then, perhaps most important of all, as the line of idling SUVs pumped remorseless cubic meters of carbon monoxide into the hot morning air, no impatience would be expressed as the parent escorted the Precious Cargo thirty feet across the gravel and through the doorway of Fielding Hall.“

The catalyst for rocking Fritz‘s world comes when his company‘s stock takes a plunge and he is arrested for insider trading. This is not acceptable to wife Linda‘s image-conscious legal firm, and she, in turn, is suspended, leading to the house being repossessed and the kids unable to cope with the family‘s sudden fall from grace. The speed with which their lives unravel is frightening, and by the time Fritz demands that Linda turn off her Blackberry to discuss the shaky foundation on which their lives have been built, you know that things will never be the same again. And if they could be, should they?
“Present Value“ is a provocative roller-coaster of a read, and Willett‘s own insider knowledge of legal and financial machinations (he‘s a lawyer) is enhanced by his witty takes on our post-9-11 world and considerable prowess at crafting characters one comes to care about despite not wanting to. Without ever preaching, he subtly steers the action into a fine morality tale about what it takes to re-evaluate priorities to find real substance and joy in life. In a year that produced an impressive amount of outstanding works of fiction and non-fiction, “Present Value“ is a tome with its feet equally balanced in both camps, and highly entertaining on top of that. Put it on your list to get to soon.


Sachs‘ mystery published

Harley L. Sachs, whose work has appeared frequently in the Express, has published the second in his series of “cozy mysteries“ set in an Oregon retirement building, “The Mystery Club and the Dead Doctor.“
In the book, Mystery Club member Viola Cartwright asks two of her friends to
investigate her Medicare bills and discovers a case of fraud. But they
also suspect that Viola‘s home helper is using a stolen identity. One
thing leads to another and soon, a murder. As the mystery club women
discover, there are consequences to their apparently harmless acts of
The book was inspired by Sachs‘ participation in the Elders in Action
program against Medicare fraud. “The Mystery Club and the Dead Doctor“ is
available only off the internet at www.WingsPress.com. The first in the
series, “The Mystery Club Solves a Murder“ is also available as an ebook
from Wings Press and in paperback from The Idea Development Company, 113
W. Houghton Ave, Houghton, MI 49931.
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