Letters

Letters 04-25-2016

Taking Our Trees Seconds ago this pine tree was alive. Well, Mr. Cook — our County Road Commission head —and Peninsula Township government … by not weighing in (I guess it’s not your problem or responsibility to communicate with residents), you allowed the County Road Commission to bulldoze down huge swaths of lakeside trees in order to increase the bike lane. This can’t be happening. I have no clue why they would cut trees down that help block snow from creating drifts on Peninsula Drive and help keep the beach area intact. Plus, they are not increasing the width of the road when they repave. I just don’t get it. This is amateur hour at county and township government...

Government Service Unrewarded I served the federal government for XX years with the [agency], [doing XX]. I also worked in the private sector, [doing XX]. When I retired, I was surprised to learn my Social Security benefit would be $XXX less per month than my colleagues and neighbors who had never worked for the federal government. This is all because of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) under the Social Security law...

Which Greased Palm Now that “Chicago values” have utterly corrupted the executive and judicial branches of our federal government, this November We the Plebeians shall either vote to right the governing integrity of the United States constitution’s twin pillars of limited government and separation of powers or turn and step collectively onto the blood soaked road to serfdom...

The Political Mess And Challenge As citizens we are faced with a real challenge. The media and the political candidates have taken over a year to attack those whom they are opposing. The unfavorable ratings of those who may be nominated are above 50 percent. That should be no surprise, considering the length of time given to bloodying one another with opinions that have little relationship to truth. The polling companies, which confess they are not reliable, make everything a game of winning...

CORRECTIONS In last week’s issue we had photos with the incorrect stories on page five. The dance photo should have accompanied the story about grants to nonprofits. The image of Crooked Tree Arts Center Petoskey should have accompanied the story about the ArtPrize exhibit at CTAC.

We also reported the incorrect day for the Bayshore Marathon in Traverse City. The correct date is Sat., May 28.

We apologize for these errors.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau...
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Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Andy Taylor - July 22nd, 2004
Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
“It takes a great artist to capture the power of a Leelanau landscape,” says John Mitchell, director of the Leelanau Historical Society. “We are honored this summer to exhibit work by such a painter... Duren’s paintings document the beauty of Leelanau today and leave for tomorrow a benchmark by which to measure our cumulative effects on the land.”
As proof of Duren’s diligent nature, he is also having another showing of pleinair (taken directly from nature) paintings at the Tamarack Gallery in Omena called “Leelanau Longviews.” All of the paintings featured here were completed this year, on location, from late spring to early summer in Leelanau County.
Duren fell in love with nature at an early age when he lived on his grandfather’s ranch in Northern California. “My emotions would follow the passage of light across the valley as it moved into dusk, and I may have connected its bittersweet hue with the pain of loneliness,” he says. “The surrounding land became a kind of surrogate parent to me, always there. I suppose it followed that at age 15 I began to paint the landscape - the longview - and never stopped.”
After being born and raised in California, Duren moved to West Michigan in 1978 to become a serious painter. He went full-time as an artist after he quit his job as an instructor at the Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. Jeffrey Meeuwsem, executive director of the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, says, “Stephen’s insightful paintings encourage us to pause long enough that we may experience the sublimity of nature.”
A reception for Duren will be held at the Tamarack Gallery on Friday, July 23 from 4 - 7 p.m. Admission to the exhibit at the Leelanau Historical Museum is $2 for adults and $1 for students. Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.


 
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