Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau...
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Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Andy Taylor - July 22nd, 2004
Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
“It takes a great artist to capture the power of a Leelanau landscape,” says John Mitchell, director of the Leelanau Historical Society. “We are honored this summer to exhibit work by such a painter... Duren’s paintings document the beauty of Leelanau today and leave for tomorrow a benchmark by which to measure our cumulative effects on the land.”
As proof of Duren’s diligent nature, he is also having another showing of pleinair (taken directly from nature) paintings at the Tamarack Gallery in Omena called “Leelanau Longviews.” All of the paintings featured here were completed this year, on location, from late spring to early summer in Leelanau County.
Duren fell in love with nature at an early age when he lived on his grandfather’s ranch in Northern California. “My emotions would follow the passage of light across the valley as it moved into dusk, and I may have connected its bittersweet hue with the pain of loneliness,” he says. “The surrounding land became a kind of surrogate parent to me, always there. I suppose it followed that at age 15 I began to paint the landscape - the longview - and never stopped.”
After being born and raised in California, Duren moved to West Michigan in 1978 to become a serious painter. He went full-time as an artist after he quit his job as an instructor at the Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. Jeffrey Meeuwsem, executive director of the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, says, “Stephen’s insightful paintings encourage us to pause long enough that we may experience the sublimity of nature.”
A reception for Duren will be held at the Tamarack Gallery on Friday, July 23 from 4 - 7 p.m. Admission to the exhibit at the Leelanau Historical Museum is $2 for adults and $1 for students. Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.


 
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