Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau...
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Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Andy Taylor - July 22nd, 2004
Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
“It takes a great artist to capture the power of a Leelanau landscape,” says John Mitchell, director of the Leelanau Historical Society. “We are honored this summer to exhibit work by such a painter... Duren’s paintings document the beauty of Leelanau today and leave for tomorrow a benchmark by which to measure our cumulative effects on the land.”
As proof of Duren’s diligent nature, he is also having another showing of pleinair (taken directly from nature) paintings at the Tamarack Gallery in Omena called “Leelanau Longviews.” All of the paintings featured here were completed this year, on location, from late spring to early summer in Leelanau County.
Duren fell in love with nature at an early age when he lived on his grandfather’s ranch in Northern California. “My emotions would follow the passage of light across the valley as it moved into dusk, and I may have connected its bittersweet hue with the pain of loneliness,” he says. “The surrounding land became a kind of surrogate parent to me, always there. I suppose it followed that at age 15 I began to paint the landscape - the longview - and never stopped.”
After being born and raised in California, Duren moved to West Michigan in 1978 to become a serious painter. He went full-time as an artist after he quit his job as an instructor at the Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. Jeffrey Meeuwsem, executive director of the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, says, “Stephen’s insightful paintings encourage us to pause long enough that we may experience the sublimity of nature.”
A reception for Duren will be held at the Tamarack Gallery on Friday, July 23 from 4 - 7 p.m. Admission to the exhibit at the Leelanau Historical Museum is $2 for adults and $1 for students. Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.


 
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