Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Dream Brother: The Lives and Music...
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Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley Tops a List of Folk Lore

Nancy Sundstrom - August 1st, 2002
“My grandfather had a beautiful voice. Irish tenor. Beautiful. Too much of a military hardass to deal with his own and his son‘s talents. I wish it were otherwise. I love you, you poor b-------.... With a father like this man, it is no wonder that Tim Buckley was afraid to come back to me. So afraid to be my father. Because his only paradigm for fatherhood was a deranged lunatic with a steel plate in his head.... I know that he must have been scared s------- to think he might possibly become like his father. Scared s------- of treating me the way his father treated him and his family. Can you imagine the heartbreak? The useless, s----- torture day in, day out?“

-- Jeff Buckley, Journal Entry, August 9, 1995

A recent rediscovery of Tim Buckley’s blisteringly erotic 1972 album, “Greetings From L.A.“ reminded me that I was long overdue to read David Browne’s acclaimed biography from earlier this year of Buckley and his son, Jeff, whose 1997 death by drowning eerily mirrored Tim’s own demise of a drug overdose in 1975.
“Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley“ proved to be engrossing, well-researched, and haunting - a dual biography of a father and son who never really knew each other, but were clearly more similar than not.
Writer Browne had his work cut out for him in creating textured portraits of two emotionally complex human beings who were also influential, original musicians, let alone relatives. Though products of different generations, each was an immensely talented folk rock cult icon whose other trademarks included artistic sensitivity and startlingly good looks. They were also equally doomed, damaged, and destined to never reach their full potential.
Father Tim began the 1960s as a quintessential folk troubadour, but emerged from the decade as a musical pioneer and offstage bad boy who bucked systems, challenged every bit of authority he encountered, and pushed limits, especially when it came to matters of carnality and illegal substances. Buckley broke new musical ground with each project he tackled, and while his genius was recognized, commercial success evaded him, something that distressed and defeated him and perhaps encouraged his increasing reliance on drugs like heroin. Quite an accomplished womanizer, his failed first marriage produced a son, Jeff, with whom he never forged a relationship.
Son Jeff was seen as a lyrical poet whose 1994 album “Grace“ revealed that he had clearly inherited his father’s musical talent and ability to electrify an audience during live performances. Within short order, especially as he fought for privacy under the increasing glare of celebrity, he demonstrated that he also had Tim’s penchant for erratic behavior. He had come to Memphis to record his eagerly awaited second album when an undertow in the Mississippi River in which he was swimming took his life. He was 30-years-old, “just two years older than was the errant father whom Jeff rejected for rejecting him.“
The ironies of their lives, talents, and deaths are explored in great detail by Browne, who drew from interviews, many exclusive, with many of the closest associates of both men, as well as letters, journals, lyrics, and unreleased recordings. Particularly poignant is Jeff’s inability to avoid some of the same twisting, unpredictable roads traveled by his father, a man for whom he truly had deep and unresolved issues. At the heart of the story is their music, which in both cases, was always about searching, and was often as bittersweet as it was exhilarating.
If “Dream Brother“ is of interest, then so might be a few other selections, starting with the hot-off-the-presses “Wished for Song: A Portrait of Jeff Buckley“ by photographer Merri Cyr, which contains 160 pages of candid shots of the singer.
Another recommendation is a bit older, though most similar in nature - “Nick Drake“ by English journalist Patrick Humphries, who has also written acclaimed biographies of Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, and Richard Thompson. The enigmatic Drake seems to have rediscovered lately when his lovely “Pink Moon“ song was used for a car commercial, and even though he released only three albums, he has long been credited as a seminal influence by artists such as REM, Elton John, and Paul Weller.
Depressed and anxious most of his life, which ended at age 26 in 1974, Drake, like Tim Buckley, died of an overdose. Humphries‘ chronicles Drake’s often bizarre life through exclusive interviews with friends, colleagues, and musicians who knew and worked with him, and while some of the anecdotes are jarring (such as Drake’s tendency to show up to perform in a highly inebriated state and make the most weird entrance he could), Humphries effectively evokes a place and time as he dissects what gave Drake’s music its power and beauty.
Lastly, “Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina, and Richard Farina“ by David Hajdu earned a spot on Amazon.com’s Best of 2001 list for its detailed, yet lyrical accounting of the wild Greenwich Village folk scene during the time that the foursome listed above were the reigning royalty.
Whether you’re a folk music fan or not, or a Dylan or Baez fan or not, this is one ripping good read, as the Brits say. Gossipy, provocative, and tragic in parts, this is a not-to-be-missed account of how four quite fabulous young people defined a bohemian lifestyle and sound, the likes of which haven’t been equaled since.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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