Letters

Letters 05-23-2016

Examine The Priorities Are you disgusted about closing schools, crumbling roads and bridges, and cuts everywhere? Investigate funding priorities of legislators. In 1985 at the request of President Reagan, Grover Norquist founded Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). For 30 years Norquist asked every federal and state candidate and incumbent to sign the pledge to vote against any increase in taxes. The cost of living has risen significantly since 1985; think houses, cars, health care, college, etc...

Make TC A Community For Children Let’s be that town that invests in children actively getting themselves to school in all of our neighborhoods. Let’s be that town that supports active, healthy, ready-to-learn children in all of our neighborhoods...

Where Are Real Christian Politicians? As a practicing Christian, I was very disappointed with the Rev. Dr. William C. Myers statements concerning the current presidential primaries (May 8). Instead of using the opportunity to share the message of Christ, he focused on Old Testament prophecies. Christ gave us a new commandment: to love one another...

Not A Great Plant Pick As outreach specialist for the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network and a citizen concerned about the health of our region’s natural areas, I was disappointed by the recent “Listen to the Local Experts” feature. When asked for their “best native plant pick,” three of the four garden centers referenced non-native plants including myrtle, which is incredibly invasive...

Truth About Plants Your feature, “listen to the local experts” contains an error that is not helpful for the birds and butterflies that try to live in northwest Michigan. Myrtle is not a native plant. The plant is also known as vinca and periwinkle...

Ask the Real Plant Experts This letter is written to express my serious concern about a recent “Listen To Your Local Experts” article where local nurseries suggested their favorite native plant. Three of the four suggested non-native plants and one suggested is an invasive and cause of serious damage to Michigan native plants in the woods. The article is both sad and alarming...

My Plant Picks In last week’s featured article “Listen to the Local Experts,” I was shocked at the responses from the local “experts” to the question about best native plant pick. Of the four “experts” two were completely wrong and one acknowledged that their pick, gingko tree, was from East Asia, only one responded with an excellent native plant, the serviceberry tree...

NOTE: Thank you to TC-based Eagle Eye Drone Service for the cover photo, taken high over Sixth Street in Traverse City.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The Great Leveling
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The Great Leveling

Robert Downes - January 29th, 2004

They’re saying prayers in the churches of Greenville, Michigan these days for the 2,781 employees who will lose their jobs when Electrolux Home Products closes its refrigerator plant there in November, 2005.
The prayers are for the soul of Greenville itself, because it‘s anyone‘s guess as to how this small town 35 miles north of Grand Rapids will survive without its largest employer.
Maybe they should say prayers for all of America, because as Greenville goes, so goes the nation.
Shades of H. Ross Perot and the giant sucking sound as our country is vacuumed of its manufacturing jobs. Shouldn‘t job loss be the top issue in the presidential election? Ideas on universal health care, prescription drug benefits, education and such are dandy, but if jobs keep disappearing, we‘ll have trouble here keeping social services on par with India.
In Greenville, the Electrolux company says it can save $81 million per year by moving its operations to Mexico. The company claims it can‘t compete against other manufacturers which have moved operations to countries where low wages and a lack of unions prevail.
Greenville‘s story offers a primer on the hazards of wishful thinking about the jam America is in, from the union hall to the governor‘s office:
Although union employees at Electrolux offered to take pay cuts, it was too little, too late. Although the town offered 20 years of no property taxes along with free land for a new plant and a new parking lot built at local expense, the deal wasn‘t good enough. Although the State of Michigan kicked in $8.7 million for infrastructure improvements and job training programs over the past 12 years, the total package wasn‘t enough to deter Electrolux from heading south of the border.
And no wonder, because according to sources such as the C.I.A.‘s World Fact Book, the per capita income of Mexico is $5,319 per year, compared to $34,858 in the United States.
How do you compete in a world where only money talks?
In India, the average person makes less than $2 per day -- maybe $500 per year. A worker in Russia may make less than $4 per day, with per capita income of $1,745 per year. As noted on “60 Minutes,“ English-speaking college grads in India are lining up for phone consultant jobs at $3,000-$5,000 per year, troubleshooting for U.S. companies that no longer wish to pay for the health benefits and fair wages of our fellow citizens.
All Americans have ever asked for is a level playing field -- unfortunately we‘re getting one on par with the poorest countries of the world.

Wedding bells are ringing

H.L. Mencken once said that a puritan is a person who lies awake nights worrying that someone, somewhere might be enjoying themselves.
That sort of thinking has to be behind the Bush administration‘s idea of spending $1.5 billion to promote the institution of marriage. Apparently, there are millions of conservatives lying awake nights worrying that some gay persons might be getting registered at Marshall Fields for tableware and towels; so we‘re going to pony up $1,500,000,000 for a public relations blitz to support marriage of the regular sort.
Better yet, we‘ll spend millions trying to encourage poor people to get married. That will help the poor learn the painful lesson of how expensive a divorce can be when their bad choice of a government-approved spouse follows its natural course.
Bravo! Here is money wisely and well-spent. People could be encouraged by the government to marry over and over again (as long as they‘re not gay, of course) under the rationale that if a little is good, then pour on the gravy. How about a marriage bounty of $50 for every time you get hitched? Think of the benefit to the wedding industry as the Britney Spears‘ of the world line up to tie the knot whenever the whim strikes.
We could also bring back biblical ideas about marriage under the Bush plan to keep his constituency happy. Trading a camel, for instance, would provide you with two wives and a fine dowry -- throw in a goat and you’d get a slave girl to boot -- just like in the Holy Land in the days of yore.
What‘s needed is a celebrity to head this initiative up, like Arnold Schwarzenegger with the President‘s Council on Fitness. How about actor Billy Bob Thornton as Minister of Marriage? He‘s been to the altar five times, most recently with Angelina Jolie -- he knows a lot about getting hitched and would set a good example for the young. Or, perhaps Elizabeth Taylor, who has seven notches in her garter belt.
It could get people excited about the institution of marriage again, even if -- as Mae West once said -- they’re not ready for an institution.
 
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