Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Books · Great Book Stores in the Big Easy
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Great Book Stores in the Big Easy

Nancy Sundstrom - May 30th, 2002
New Orleans is my favorite city in the world, partially because like others (the list including London, Paris, New York, Chicago, and San Francisco), it has a remarkable literary heritage - one rich as a dessert of Grand Marnier bread pudding at Commander’s Palace, as spicy as the great gumbo found everywhere, and as varied as the human drama that plays itself out every five feet on the endlessly fascinating streets of the French Quarter.
Somewhat to the consternation of my family, I really indulged myself by spending more time than usual in the bookstores of the Quarter on a recent vacation to the Big Easy. The stores themselves truly reflect the marvelous tapestry of life in one of America’s oldest and most unique cities. It just doesn’t cut it to wander in to a national chain store (you know the names), when you can browse in the likes of the Garden District Book Shop where Anne Rice does all of her book signings, or lose yourself dreaming about taking home one of the rare collectibles at Faulkner House Books, a store that is, hands down, and like the city, my favorite in the world.
While there’s a lot to compete for your attention in the Crescent City, be it dining, historical sightseeing, people watching, or taking in a dizzying array of live music options, the next time you’re lucky enough to find yourself down there, check out a few of these recommendations.

Faulkner House Books
624 Pirate’s Alley (behind St. Louis Cathedral) 504-524-2940 www.faulknerhousebooks.com
This treasure trove is on a number of French Quarter walking tours because Nobel Prize-winning author Faulkner lived here in 1925, when he was writing “Mosquitoes“ and “Soldier’s Pay.“ The shop does hold a large collection of Faulkner first editions and rare and first edition classics by numerous other authors, including playwright Tennessee Williams, a longtime resident of the French Quarter who wrote “A Streetcar Named Desire“ while living there. FHB has been hailed by many a travel guide as having the best selection per square foot of any bookstore anywhere, but the customer service is equally outstanding. There seems to be nothing the store’s staff don’t know, and they’ll go out of their way to assist you, making a stop there always memorable, and quite often magical. It’s fairly small - comprised of just one main room and a hallway - and you can just feel the spirit of Faulkner himself smiling down on anyone who loves good books.

Garden District Book Shop
2727 Prytania (in the Rink) 504-895-2266 GDKreweaol.com
One of the most distinctive features of this cool bookstore, located in the heart of the beautiful Garden District with extraordinary homes that belong to the likes of Anne Rice and Trent Reznor, is that if you’re looking for any subject in reference to New Orleans or any region of Louisiana, you can be guaranteed you’ll find it. As mentioned, this is where Rice does book signings for her new work (the Anne Rice Collection store is also housed in the same building), and they have quite a few of her autographed books, as well as special editions of her works that they publish themselves, and a large number of signed books from authors ranging from Clive Barker to James Lee Burke.

915 Barracks (on the outskirts of the French Quarter) 504-529-5780 kaboombks@aol.com
You’ll find used books only here, but there’s very little you won’t find in general, especially in the fiction genre. The local lore is that the owner, who has a reputation for knowing more about literature than any other human walking the planet, is one of the main reason bibliophiles regularly seek out this shop, and to eavesdrop on some of their conversations is as educational as it is entertaining.

414 N. Peters 504-523-6411
This is a Barnes & Noble affiliate, but it really doesn’t feel like a franchise, thanks largely to a huge selection of New Orleans-related books, especially on the topics of food, architecture, jazz, history, art, photography, and novels written about the city.

Beckham’s Boookshop
228 Decatur 504-522-9875
Allow yourself some time to wander through two vast floors of antique and old editions, rare secondhands, bargain basement paperbacks, and who knows how many classical albums. It’s a good thing you can settle into one of a number of inviting armchairs to consider your purchases in this shop, which is considered a must-stop for dealers, collectors, and those seeking out the elusive. The owners also operate Librairie Bookshop at 823 Chartres (504-525-4837).

Faubourg Marigny Bookstore
600 Frenchmen 504-943-9875
This progressive, independent store is a resource for the city’s gay and lesbian community, and in addition to a good range of books that include local titles, there are gift items, cards, CD’s, and posters, most of which have a gay/lesbian motif. Live entertainment, book signing, readings, and talks are regularly offered.

Maple Street Book Shop
7523 Maple 504-866-4916

Maple Street Children’s Book Shop
7529 Maple 504-861-2105
It’s worth it to venture uptown a bit from the Quarter, and these two stores, located next to each other on Maple Street, will prove worth the trip. The original location in a shotgun house has been around for several decades, and has a reading room where you can peruse their large variety of mysteries and Pulitzer Prize winning books. The Children’s Book Shop is the only one of its kind in the city to specialize exclusively in fare for the younger set and has weekend story telling. Down the way a bit is Maple Street’s Old Metairie Book Shop at 200 Metairie (504-832-8937).

George Herget Books
3109 Magazine 504-891-6696
This is another of New Orleans’s signature bookstores, especially since it boasts more than 20,000 rare and used books, quite a few of which are considered hard to find. Local and regional fare abound, but ask away if there’s anything you’re looking for or curious about. Like every other store on this list, the staff is exceedingly helpful and love to talk shop.

Various Specialty
New Orleans also has numerous book stores devoted to specific genres of literature, and to mention just a few, there is the Afro-American Book Stop in the New Orleans Shopping Centre and Community Book Center on Broad Street, Starling Books on Royale and East Meets West Bookstore on Melvil Dewey Drive for selections on witchcraft, magic, new age philosophy, and divination, and the Catholic Book Store on Fig Street, adjacent to the Notre Dame Seminary.
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