Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Mark O‘Connor Likes to...
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Mark O‘Connor Likes to Fiddle Around

Ross Boissoneau - June 30th, 2005
Time was when traditional music – that amalgam of country, bluegrass, swing and folk – got short shrift from the musical cognoscenti.
Then Mark O’Connor came along, and things have never been quite the same.
Not that the nonpareil fiddler would ever claim complete credit for this musical turnaround, but the evidence is compelling: There are his albums with Edgar Meyer and Yo Yo Ma. There’s his status within the musical community, where he performs with symphony orchestras. His Hot Swing trio revives the spirit of the legendary jazz music of Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grapelli. And now his latest release, the “Double Violin Concerto” with Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, takes things a step further, with his compositions and his playing taking center stage alongside one of the country’s top young violinists.
“Nothing has changed that much except I’ve been able to build my repertoire,” said O’Connor rather modestly, who says his ability to concentrate on composing and collaborating with other players is a great treat.
“I’ve been composing since I was a kid,” he added.
That he has. He composed nearly every tune on his many albums. On earlier albums, such as “Meanings Of” or “Stone From Which The Arch Was Made,” O’Connor played, well, pretty much everything: fiddle, of course, as well as guitar, banjo, bass, keyboards, pretty much everything except drums. These new agey albums were somewhat in contrast to his solo bluegrass work, his jazzgrass albums as part of David Grisman’s group, and his short stint with fusion favorites the Dixie Dregs.
Still just in his early 40s, O’Connor feels he is just coming into his own. Even after exploring so many different genres, he continues to seek new means of musical expression. Yet he continues to champion the traditional style he grew up with as a National Junior Fiddle Champion, even as it grows into something different.
“I did okay with class this past weekend at Julliard,” he says, noting slyly how he held his own with the likes of his predecessor, the renowned Itzhak Perlman. He looks at his current playlist as some of the best music he’s ever written and is effusive in his praise of his fellow musicians.
“This is music I’ve redone from the original versions. I’ve adapted violin, cello and bass for violin, viola and cello, and I’m very, very happy with the result,” O’Connor said. “Natalie and Carla (cellist Natalie Haas and violist Carla Cook, the members of his Appalachia String Trio) are two of the finest string players I’ve ever played with. It’s the kind of sound and tone and beauty you just dream about.”
During his residency at Interlochen, O’Connor will perform with his Appalachia Waltz trio (June 30) as well as the World Youth Symphony Orchestra (July 3). Tickets for both shows are available by calling the Interlochen box office at 276-8800.

 
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