Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Star Sailor
. . . .

Star Sailor

Harley Sachs - July 7th, 2005
There’s a whirligig gadget on my window sill that may have come from a science museum, for it illustrates a power of light that is now being applied to space flight. It resembles a clear glass light bulb, but instead of a filament inside there’s a little windmill -- four black and white paddles that rotate on needle mounted in a pillar of glass. When sunlight strikes the paddles the gadget turns and in bright sunlight it spins. As long as the sun shines on it, it keeps on spinning.
The principle is simple: the pressure of the beams of light striking the blades causes the gadget to spin. This wouldn’t work if the blades were not sealed in a vacuum, for the pressure of the light is not strong enough to turn the blades in the presence of resistant air. This might seem like a perpetual motion machine, were it not for two factors. Eventually the pivot point where the blades rest on the column will wear out. So far, after many years on my window sill, that hasn’t happened. What has prevented this device from running forever is that the glass is not totally impermeable. Atom by atom, air has penetrated the glass so it is not a perfect vacuum and it takes more and more intense sunlight to make it turn.
But what if the same principle were applied to a sail on a space ship? Then, like the marvelous prairie schooner of Pecos Bill sailing across the sea of grass of our Great Plains, a space ship would go on in the vacuum of space, accelerating forever.

ULTRA-THIN SAILS
That was precisely the intention of a new space experiment launched from the Russian nuclear submarine Borisoglebsk. A Volne intercontinental ballistic missile was modified to carry the sailing space vehicle, Cosmos-1 and launched on what was planned to be a 500 mile high orbit. That was a nice peaceful modification for an otherwise lethal ICBM.
According to the website for the California-based Planetary Society, which sponsored the craft, signals were recorded independently at three ground stations, at Petropavlovsk in Kamchatka, Majuro in the Marshall Islands and Panska Ves in the Czech Republic, that Cosmos-1 was expected to pass over.
The society web page describes the Cosmos 1 as having eight triangular sails, each 50 feet long with the spacecraft’s body at the center. If the launch was successful, once reaching orbit the space craft would open the ultra-thin sails to be driven by the power of impacting photons from the sun, just like my window sill gadget.
This is seen as a solution for space flight, for such a space ship doesn’t need to carry fuel for propulsion. Like my 22-foot-sloop which sails Lake Superior on free wind, the Cosmos-1 would sail through space propelled by the pressure of a kind of solar wind.

MISSING
Unfortunately, although it was sponsored by Planetary Society enthusiasts from around the world, the Cosmos-1 has gone missing.. Apparently one engine of the Volne missile failed and the Cosmos-1 disappeared.
This doesn’t mean that the adventure is over. If you visit their web site you’ll discover that the Society sells T shirts, Cosmos-1 souvenirs, and posts a great deal of information about space flight going back to the days of Jules Verne and other science fiction imagineers for whom the Cosmos-1 is a present reality.
Now when I look at that little spinning solar windmill on my window sill, I will think of the Cosmos-1 and adventures of future sailors in space.





 
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