Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · You too could be a cell phone...
. . . .

You too could be a cell phone journalist

Harley Sachs - July 21st, 2005
When the grandson of Vincent Van Gogh was stabbed to death on the streets of Amsterdam for having made a film about the plight of Moslem women, the first picture taken of his body -- theww picture that appeared in the newspapers -- was not taken by a press photographer. It was taken by a passerby with a cell phone.
Today the majority of telephones are no longer hard-wired. They’re portable. Wherever you go you see drivers talking on their cell phones and pedestrians talking into their hands, Now, with some phones capable not only of taking pictures but of making short videos, almost everyone can become part of the world news network.
This was particularly evident in the London bombing episode, People trapped in the subway tunnels, in the disabled trains and on the streets where the bus was blown up were taking pictures and sending them to the press. At least a dozen such videos were passed on to the BBC for rebroadcast.
Before any journalist could get from Fleet Street to the tubes, here was a video clip with the sound of someone trapped in the wreckage and screaming for help. Without the cell phones, this kind of immediacy rarely happens.
Of course, for now the quality of the pictures and the clips is not comparable to what can be shot by those cumbersome cameras lugged on the shoulders of TV crews, but in the news business, immediacy is key. Commentary comes afterwards.
Where would we be without those portable devices? With everyone armed with instant communication like this, no cop should dare beat up on any Rodney King. The British police are no doubt scouring the cell phone pictures for any sign of the perpetrators of those terrorist acts.
Thanks to the cell phones, in case of emergency you need hardly look for a pay phone and fumble in your pocket for change. When I was in the grocery store one day a man had an epileptic seizure. Before I could get to the service desk to tell someone to call an ambulance, a women at the end of the aisle was already dialing 911 on her cell phone.
Commit a crime on a crowded street and you may find your picture flashed immediately to the police and the press.
This makes everyone who might witness a newsworthy event an amateur journalist photographer. No need to think about lugging a traditional Speed Graphic with a pocketful of flash bulbs, or even a 35mm SLR camera. In the hopes of getting a good shot. That all-in-one device, your cell phone, is right there.
If that technology had been available we might have had sound videos and still shots of the hijackers aboard the airplanes on 9-11. No need to retrieve film from the wreckage. The images would already be transmitted. It’s a chilling thought.
Though London public places are under constant surveillance by thousands of TV cameras, with over 2,500 video clips being examined in the wake of the bombings, it was the people themselves who got us the pictures of the events as they happened. Think of the implications, not only for journalists, but for the police. People are notoriously inaccurate witnesses, but their cell phones may catch the true story as it happens.
To facilitate your getting a scoop with your cell phone, why not pre-program the dailer with the numbers of your local newspaper and TV station? If you have instant messaging your on-the-spot report will be only a few clicks away from the headline news.
Perhaps this newspaper will run a “cell phone shot of the week” feature, posting the most newsworthy picture. Think of the opportunities: catching criminals in the act, portraits of babies and puppies, sporting events, parades, festivals. No newspaper can employ a staff large enough to be on-the-spot everywhere. With a cell phone in nearly every pocket, the journalistic opportunities are everywhere.
 
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