Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · A Smash Hit
. . . .

A Smash Hit

Robert Downes - August 4th, 2005
There doesn‘t seem to be enough superlatives in the dictionary to describe the success of the first Traverse City Film Festival, which drew thunderous applause, standing ovations and full
houses at the 600-seat State Theatre throughout the week.
At a pre-festival party, co-founder and Oscar-winning filmmaker Michael Moore said the event had sold 15,000 advance tickets before it opened, an unparalleled feat for a first-time film festival and the envy of directors everywhere.
Perhaps even more amazing was the fact that the festival was organized in a mere two months. Author Doug Stanton who also co-founded the event with Traverse City photographer John Robert Williams, said that he and Moore had discussed the possibility of a film festival for several years but was astounded when the filmmaker decided to move ahead with the idea in May with virtually no staff or funding.
Then too, the dilapidated State Theatre had languished for years in a state of disrepair, with local promises to refurbish the building going nowhere.
Support came quickly, however, with more than 100 area businesses turning out to sponsor the event and scores of volunteers materializing to spruce up the State (the theater also benefited from an “anonymous“ donation by Moore) And although the festival‘s all-volunteer organization suffered much in the way of infighting, turf wars and resignations, somehow the show managed to go on.
Politics went by the wayside, with filmgoers seeming resolute to accept Moore‘s promise that the event would be about enjoying good films rather than whipping up controversy. When a sailboat went past the Open Space showing of “Jaws“ with the far-right counter film festival promoted on its sails, it was greeted with a mixture of boos and yawns from the crowd of more than 6,000.
No one seemed more surprised by the level of acceptance from Traverse City‘s largely Republican business community than Michael Moore. Speaking at the opening night showing of “Mad Hot Ballroom,“ he said he never dreamed two months ago that conservative talk radio station WTCM-AM would sign on as a sponsor. He also thanked Republican State Rep. Kevin Elsenheimer (R-Bellaire) for supporting the festival in a courageous local newspaper column. Former Republican Gov. Bill Milliken and his wife Helen received thanks for sponsoring one of the festival‘s major events.
“That‘s the great thing about America,“ Moore told the crowd on opening night. “Although we may disagree at times and have different ideas and backgrounds, we can still come together to make good things happen.“

-- by Robert Downes

The ‘Other‘ Film Festival...
in Harbor Springs
It‘s the Blissfest‘s four-part Irish Film Fest, which kicks off at the Harbor Springs Middle School Cafeteria on Wednesday August 4. Irish music and a brief introductory lecture begins the evening’s program at 7:15 p.m.
Irish films dealing with famine, revolution and emigration will be shown each Wednesday night during August, including “The Great Hunger,“ “Captain Lightfoot,“ “Out of Ireland“ and “Beloved Enemy,“ leading up to the Harbor Celtic Festival to be held August 26-27 at Zorn Park.
 
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