Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The Smell of Money: Pumping gas...
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The Smell of Money: Pumping gas from landfills

Harley Sachs - August 11th, 2005
Here in the U.P we used to call them
bear pits. They were the open garbage dumps where tourists occasionally would try to
put their kiddies on the backs of hungry
wild bears in the hopes of getting that great souvenir photo, sometimes with unhappy results.
Turns out that calling our dumps bear pits was a misnomer. The proper name for what are
now officially sanitary landfills is money pits. Not only can municipalities reap substantial rewards from tipping fees of $90 a ton,
but they can also mine those mountains
of trash for valuable gasses and turn them into electricity.
That’s what R.G. Engineering Company of Webberville, Michigan is doing for
their clients.
If a landfill is designed properly, that is. Lined first with a heavy plastic to prevent seepage into the ground water, all those goodies stay put, waiting to be harvested. In particular, what Jon Rabitoy, president of RPG, is after is trapped methane.
We’re all familiar with methane. It’s
the gas we generate ourselves after a meal
of bad chili or cauliflower. We don’t generate enough to utilize other than to light as
a bachelor party prank, but a sealed landfill has plenty.
It works like this: gas wells are sunk from 30 to 90 feet in the landfill and a gentle vacuum sucks out the methane. It is then run through a battery of converters. Usually four are set up, with three always running while a fourth gets routine maintenance.
According to a confidential report from Rabitoy’s company, “Neenah/Menasha, Wisconsin developed a landfill over a 10-year period. The landfill was filled, capped and a collection system was installed 18 months ago. Today the landfill generates and flares 1,000 ft3/min of landfill methane gas, where the gas temperature is 96 degrees F and is delivered at 1 psig pressure to the flare.”
The electricity generated by this system is incredibly cheap, 2 cents a kilowatt hour created from the landfill gas which costs half a cent per kilowatt hour to recover.
The electricity is then sold for 5.5 cents a kilowatt hour, and the project’s net revenue is estimated at $475,146, with a simple payback for the project of 9.25 years.
Other systems can recoup the initial costs in less time, 5.1 years. Even more rapid payback can be derived from animal waste.
My brother was once part owner of a pig farm where the noxious waste was turned into methane to provide energy. They generated enough electricity on the farm to provide all their energy needs. A feed lot may produce many tons of animal waste. Anyone who’s lived within nostril range of one of those can testify to the noxiousness of that, but the electricity generated from that animal waste can recoup the costs of the installation in little over a year.
The electricity these systems generate is sold to the electric grid to supplement power generated by conventional plants. No wonder a landfill can turn into a profit for a municipality! They can collect at both ends.
What’s clear is that waste products from feed lots and city landfills can put a significant dent in our need for energy. I suspect that the Keweenaw bears are disappointed to no longer have easy pickings at our garbage dump, but if we go the way of Neenah/Menasha and other municipalities we’ll not only get some extra income, but we’ll utilize some of those infamous greenhouse gasses. Oh, and turn the stink to cash. You never knew the smell of money had an odor like that.
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