Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

Home · Articles · News · Features · The Smell of Money: Pumping gas...
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The Smell of Money: Pumping gas from landfills

Harley Sachs - August 11th, 2005
Here in the U.P we used to call them
bear pits. They were the open garbage dumps where tourists occasionally would try to
put their kiddies on the backs of hungry
wild bears in the hopes of getting that great souvenir photo, sometimes with unhappy results.
Turns out that calling our dumps bear pits was a misnomer. The proper name for what are
now officially sanitary landfills is money pits. Not only can municipalities reap substantial rewards from tipping fees of $90 a ton,
but they can also mine those mountains
of trash for valuable gasses and turn them into electricity.
That’s what R.G. Engineering Company of Webberville, Michigan is doing for
their clients.
If a landfill is designed properly, that is. Lined first with a heavy plastic to prevent seepage into the ground water, all those goodies stay put, waiting to be harvested. In particular, what Jon Rabitoy, president of RPG, is after is trapped methane.
We’re all familiar with methane. It’s
the gas we generate ourselves after a meal
of bad chili or cauliflower. We don’t generate enough to utilize other than to light as
a bachelor party prank, but a sealed landfill has plenty.
It works like this: gas wells are sunk from 30 to 90 feet in the landfill and a gentle vacuum sucks out the methane. It is then run through a battery of converters. Usually four are set up, with three always running while a fourth gets routine maintenance.
According to a confidential report from Rabitoy’s company, “Neenah/Menasha, Wisconsin developed a landfill over a 10-year period. The landfill was filled, capped and a collection system was installed 18 months ago. Today the landfill generates and flares 1,000 ft3/min of landfill methane gas, where the gas temperature is 96 degrees F and is delivered at 1 psig pressure to the flare.”
The electricity generated by this system is incredibly cheap, 2 cents a kilowatt hour created from the landfill gas which costs half a cent per kilowatt hour to recover.
The electricity is then sold for 5.5 cents a kilowatt hour, and the project’s net revenue is estimated at $475,146, with a simple payback for the project of 9.25 years.
Other systems can recoup the initial costs in less time, 5.1 years. Even more rapid payback can be derived from animal waste.
My brother was once part owner of a pig farm where the noxious waste was turned into methane to provide energy. They generated enough electricity on the farm to provide all their energy needs. A feed lot may produce many tons of animal waste. Anyone who’s lived within nostril range of one of those can testify to the noxiousness of that, but the electricity generated from that animal waste can recoup the costs of the installation in little over a year.
The electricity these systems generate is sold to the electric grid to supplement power generated by conventional plants. No wonder a landfill can turn into a profit for a municipality! They can collect at both ends.
What’s clear is that waste products from feed lots and city landfills can put a significant dent in our need for energy. I suspect that the Keweenaw bears are disappointed to no longer have easy pickings at our garbage dump, but if we go the way of Neenah/Menasha and other municipalities we’ll not only get some extra income, but we’ll utilize some of those infamous greenhouse gasses. Oh, and turn the stink to cash. You never knew the smell of money had an odor like that.
 
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