Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Spy Drones
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Spy Drones

Harley Sachs - September 1st, 2005

When we first sent men into orbit they reported that the only man-made object visible from space was the Great Wall of China. Now astronauts report that at their altitude of about 100 miles they can plainly observe the environmental devastation caused by humans. Deforestation, the resulting erosion, and coastal pollution are visible from space.
Unfortunately, satellites to monitor these developments are expensive to launch and they orbit the earth about every 90 minutes. It would be better if observations could be made continuously at a lower altitude. Enter the UAV, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.
The goal is to develop a drone that will fly indefinitely over a chosen area, sending down pictures to observers on earth. The UAV will be the latest evolution of the unmanned drones first developed by the Israelis in their continuous struggle against Palestinian terrorism. The Israeli drones, controlled from the ground, sent back television signals to pinpoint the sites, for instance, where rockets were being launched.
The Israeli idea was further developed for the U.S. forces and it is estimated that as many as 800 such drones are now patrolling the skies of Afghanistan and Iraq. The drones are so small that they are virtually invisible to conventional radar. Follow the path, for instance, of a helium filled balloon some child has released. It rises higher and higher, but soon your eyes are no longer sharp enough to spot it. That’s the beauty of a drone that’s invisible from the ground and doesn’t risk the life of a pilot or the expense of a slow-flying plane if it’s shot down.
But the ideal UAV must fly indefinitely, circling the target area possibly for months without landing. To fly indefinitely means no refueling. To do that requires solar power.
After the first human-powered airplane crossed the English Channel, the feat was repeated by a solar-powered airplane. Of course, it could fly only as long as the sun provided energy to the panels on the wings.
Now for another acronym: HALE, standing for high-altitude long-endurance. A new HALE drone, built by former UK defense research lab QinetiQ, will push the boundaries for eternal planes a bit further. What it needs to keep flying at night is battery power. As Dr. Rogoyski, a key authority on the project, reports, the key to success of the HALE UAVs is the rapid advance in solar panels and lithium batteries.
If a lithium battery array with a 20% efficiency can be developed, those high-flying HALE drones will be able to stay up indefinitely, able to reach anywhere on the earth in less than 24 hours. Then those drones will be able to monitor crops, drought, and other agricultural factors. Drones are not just for fighting terrorists anymore.
I remember building model airplanes when I was a kid in the days of balsa wood, tissue paper, and propellers powered by a rubber band. My biggest model was able to take off and actually fly a few feet before running out of rubber power. Imagine what it would have been like to fly it on solar power alone.
Of course, that’s what Pegasus is supposed to do. It’s hard to imagine a plane with a wing span of 16m and a light weight of 27kg (that’s 53.3 feet and 52 pounds for the metrically challenged). One person could easily carry it. To achieve that the solar panels must be paper thin, the skeleton of ultra light carbon fibers, and the batteries and the transmission equipment incredibly small and lightweight.
The drones already developed have broken altitude records, flying as high as 94,000 feet, the edge of space. The HALE will fly in the stratosphere. Maybe they should have named it Icarus.

 
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