Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · For the Taking: Emmet...
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For the Taking: Emmet County Case has Ramifications for Entire Region

John R. Rohe - September 16th, 2004
Emmet County Commissioners have authorized 300,000 square feet of retail commercial space on property zoned residential and agricultural. (The board approved settlement of a lawsuit that permits the Petoskey Investment Group to develop 89 acres south of Wal-Mart in Bear Creek Township – a development opposed by local voters in a referendum. – ed.)
If you did not know this was in the works, it’s because you were not invited. An alleged “substantial risk of a multi-million dollar judgment” alarmed the commissioners. Let’s examine the risk.
If a zoning ordinance “takes” essentially all reasonable value and uses from the land, then the Constitution requires the owner be reimbursed. Thus, if the Petoskey Investment Group’s land could not reasonably be used for residential or farm uses, then the County may have the risk of loss.
The Group purchased the land zoned residential and agricultural. The permitted uses did not change after the purchase. Every plan proposed by the Petoskey Investment Group included extensive areas for residential homes. Yet, the Group claimed the land could not feasibly be used for residences. If the County’s risk seems counter-intuitive, well, it is. There is no constitutional right to buy low and sell high.
Our legacy, just like every generation before us, will be defined by the monuments left on the land. Historic towns became the cultural, civic, economic, and social centers. Community planners and the public memorialized a sense of place.
Communities are appreciating the loss to low density, auto-dependent, urban sprawl. Anytown, USA, bears uniformly franchised outlets, billboard peppered roads, architecturally uneventful big-boxes, parking lagoons, boarded-up store fronts, and abandoned areas. Lighting draws the curtain on the night sky while remote corporate headquarters pull the shade on local entrepreneurship.
Michigan has developed strategies to preserve communities. Our Governor is promoting a Cool Cities initiative. The Bear Creek Referendum expressed this sensitivity by firmly rejecting yet another sprawling mall.
Planning a land use legacy is a public process. It draws on hometown democracy in the creation of a master plan, public meetings, expert input, visioning sessions, educational forums, community planners, land use literature, and the adoption of a zoning ordinance. The planning process enables a community to plan the long range, big picture, proactively. In contrast, the response to a lawsuit is short range, microscopic, and reactive.
The County’s 300,000 square foot concession was reached in mediation behind closed doors. Mediation works well when the chips on the negotiating table belong to the parties. But in a zoning dispute, the bargaining chips belong to the public. Countless hours of donated time by community members have been invested in planning the big picture. This investment is lost when a microscopic planning process is ushered behind closed doors by special interests.
Everyone has not lost. The insurance company paying for the county’s lawyers no longer risks more attorney fees. The congested federal court docket has one less case. And, Petoskey Investment Group, struggling for 175,000 commercial net square feet in the Court of Appeals, now receives 300,000 gross square feet.
For others, the loss is real. The porch light on our courthouse now becomes a beacon for more zoning litigation. Anyone disappointed with the irksome public in zoning hearings should move the dispute into court. Why tolerate pesky neighbors in open meetings? Why risk the publicity? Why not just hammer out a settlement behind closed doors?
Emmet County has weakened the effort to constrain sprawl within zoning lines. It skirts the public voice in a referendum. It sidesteps the efforts of professional planners and zoning administrators. It enfeebles the cooperative spirit among municipal entities. It harbingers the courts as a zoning board of appeals. By settling one suit, the county spawns many more.
The framers of the constitution attempted to form a more perfect union, to establish justice, and to promote the general welfare of we, the people. They would be sadly disappointed to find their words have been twisted into a battering ram for commercial excesses on our edge of time.
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