Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Features · It‘s Never too Late for...
. . . .

It‘s Never too Late for Triathlon: Janet Weiler Tackles Chicago at Age 68

Mary Bevans Gillett - January 27th, 2005
At age 68, many people are thinking about slowing down and relaxing into retirement. Janet Weiler turned 68 and decided to compete in her first triathlon.
Weiler’s running shoes have seen their share of competition during the past year, having completed the Detroit Marathon on October 24. She also competed in the Interlochen and Chicago Triathlons as well as the Chicago Marathon, where she joined family, friends and 32,000 other runners in a trek through the Windy City.
The Weiler family ran as a group, joined by all three of her children and one son’s girlfriend. “I think one son (a serious bicyclist from California) came to really appreciate marathons … I’m not sure that he’ll ever do another one.”

MAKING THE SWITCH
After competing in several marathons, Weiler decided to turn her attention to triathlons instead.
“I’m a hiker, a biker and I love to swim,” she said. “After running the Chicago Marathon, I thought that it might be better on my body if I wasn’t pounding the same muscles over and over again.”
So Weiler, who has lived in Empire for the past 10 years, began training for the Olympic length competition consisting of a six-mile run, 26-mile bike ride and a one-mile swim. She completed both in just under four hours – 3:49 in Interlochen and 3:38 in Chicago, crediting the improved Chicago time to flat terrain.
“At Interlochen you finish running with a gigantic hill right at the end,” Weiler said. “It went straight up and I just groaned. That was the 11-minute difference.”
Weiler took first place in her age class in Chicago, and continues a daily training regimen which includes a one mile swim every day during the summer as well as frequent trips to the biking and hiking trails.
“It’s much more interesting to train,” Weiler said, “It’s seems less concentrated but I’m convinced it’s better for your body.”

EARLY BLOOMER
Weiler’s love of sports began early. She was a cheerleader in her West Lafayette High School Class of 1954, but found most ‘official’ high school sports off limits to girls. An avid tennis player, she had to play pick-up games with Purdue students to get the chance to hit the courts.
“Physical fitness for women wasn’t valued,” Weiler said, noting that, as a result, you don’t see many older women competing in marathons or triathlons alongside the men.
“But I suspect this generation of 30-40 year olds will be different... I predict that they will do these difficult sports for a very long time.”
Weiler has been pleased with the response she’s received as an older athlete.
“At first I thought others would wonder what I was doing there,” she said, “but just the opposite was true…several actually said, ‘I hope that’s where I’ll be when I’m your age.”
“There is so much camaraderie and support,” Weiler said. “Most people just want to finish and they encourage each other. There aren’t many endeavors in life that there’s that much encouragement and camaraderie.
“It’s just marvelous!” she said. “After Chicago, my son said, ‘you’re a rock star.’”
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close