Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Features · It‘s Never too Late for...
. . . .

It‘s Never too Late for Triathlon: Janet Weiler Tackles Chicago at Age 68

Mary Bevans Gillett - January 27th, 2005
At age 68, many people are thinking about slowing down and relaxing into retirement. Janet Weiler turned 68 and decided to compete in her first triathlon.
Weiler’s running shoes have seen their share of competition during the past year, having completed the Detroit Marathon on October 24. She also competed in the Interlochen and Chicago Triathlons as well as the Chicago Marathon, where she joined family, friends and 32,000 other runners in a trek through the Windy City.
The Weiler family ran as a group, joined by all three of her children and one son’s girlfriend. “I think one son (a serious bicyclist from California) came to really appreciate marathons … I’m not sure that he’ll ever do another one.”

MAKING THE SWITCH
After competing in several marathons, Weiler decided to turn her attention to triathlons instead.
“I’m a hiker, a biker and I love to swim,” she said. “After running the Chicago Marathon, I thought that it might be better on my body if I wasn’t pounding the same muscles over and over again.”
So Weiler, who has lived in Empire for the past 10 years, began training for the Olympic length competition consisting of a six-mile run, 26-mile bike ride and a one-mile swim. She completed both in just under four hours – 3:49 in Interlochen and 3:38 in Chicago, crediting the improved Chicago time to flat terrain.
“At Interlochen you finish running with a gigantic hill right at the end,” Weiler said. “It went straight up and I just groaned. That was the 11-minute difference.”
Weiler took first place in her age class in Chicago, and continues a daily training regimen which includes a one mile swim every day during the summer as well as frequent trips to the biking and hiking trails.
“It’s much more interesting to train,” Weiler said, “It’s seems less concentrated but I’m convinced it’s better for your body.”

EARLY BLOOMER
Weiler’s love of sports began early. She was a cheerleader in her West Lafayette High School Class of 1954, but found most ‘official’ high school sports off limits to girls. An avid tennis player, she had to play pick-up games with Purdue students to get the chance to hit the courts.
“Physical fitness for women wasn’t valued,” Weiler said, noting that, as a result, you don’t see many older women competing in marathons or triathlons alongside the men.
“But I suspect this generation of 30-40 year olds will be different... I predict that they will do these difficult sports for a very long time.”
Weiler has been pleased with the response she’s received as an older athlete.
“At first I thought others would wonder what I was doing there,” she said, “but just the opposite was true…several actually said, ‘I hope that’s where I’ll be when I’m your age.”
“There is so much camaraderie and support,” Weiler said. “Most people just want to finish and they encourage each other. There aren’t many endeavors in life that there’s that much encouragement and camaraderie.
“It’s just marvelous!” she said. “After Chicago, my son said, ‘you’re a rock star.’”
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close