Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · New Location for Art & Soul Gallery
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New Location for Art & Soul Gallery

Susan Spear - January 27th, 2005
In an adventurous step forward, Art & Soul Gallery has reinvented itself in the Front Street Commons, among nearby bustling businesses, an array of restaurants and popular gift shops.
Owners Amy and Steve Stinson have purposely taken on the “A” location in Traverse City’s shopping corridor (also known as the Arcade) to become a “destination” on downtown Front Street.
“We offer one-of-a-kind art and handmade objects for office, home and body,” Amy says. “It’s no secret that I love jewelry and baubles, but our overall art collection lets you experience the sensibility of this area and beyond. We are very excited about being a part of downtown.”
Honoring the lofting gallery movement of the 1970s, the Stinsons have created an urban atmosphere where paintings, pastels, illustrations, sculpture, glass, fiber and pottery are the center of attention. With a great deal of old fashion hard work, friends and family uncovered the ceiling ductwork and the post-and-beam structure.
The Stinsons brightened the brick interior with fresh paint, carpet and new lighting - reflecting their upbeat personalities. Amy frowns facetiously at gallery manager Pam Dow and states, “Pickaxes aside, our mission now is to put art into everyday life, because art feeds the spirit.”
Tantalizing their patrons with metaphors of fantasy and pastel-hued landscapes, the collaborative management duo has chosen artists by mingling local “high art” with shimmering highfalutin’ glitter.
Undaunted by convention, Stinson and Dow, in an added breach of decorum, have also included more naïve art. Naive, self-taught artists and their playful works tend to challenge the more accepted “academicisms” with their simplistic approach.
On a dedicated wall, Jil Johnson’s naive structures are composed of a variety of materials; combinations of humble wood and found materials - like scraps of fabric and metal. With both invention and expression, her creations simultaneously embody an endearing sense of humor, absurdity and warmth.
Usually more visceral than intellectual, Johnson begins with a preconceived plan, but ultimately works intuitively, allowing the figures to reveal themselves. The busy new mother’s forms have a delightful range of homespun allegories and traps. Her large horse profile is ecstatically relevant - attuning the viewer to Johnson’s subtle wit.
Moving through the gallery, conversations naturally focus on another standout genre. Local NMC instructor Jerry Gates, known for his vital continuity of work, is securely enthroned with his unequivocal nod to Robert Motherwell and Franz Kline, elegant stylized abstraction and controlled intellectualism. Each oil pastel over acrylic is an effective study of the issues of form, line and color, but this modern iconoclast (or sometimes outlaw Surrealist) could step beyond his nature to glimpse the audacious ideas that challenged institutions of the past to bring his paintings over-the-top. Meantime, regulars can continue to take pleasure in his pure abstractions, sublime landscapes and visionary textural still lifes, but of course - always reflecting a strong measure of control.
Gargantuan horses seem to prevail at the new Art and Soul Gallery. Dan Heron’s horse study is centerstage without any flourishing illusions. Since the Renaissance, artists have been preoccupied with various ideas about how to represent three-dimensional forms on a two-dimensional plane. One after another pictorial mode has been explored and challenged. The recent Minimalist Movement reduces canvases to one plane only.
Heron’s work explores and redefines this recent representation of dimensionality. His horse becomes an intentional fragmentation in a uniformity of color and tonality, where forms seem to float rather than recede into the delicate gray plane. Heron’s quiet aesthetic is deliberately spatial using surface relationships to create a space within a space.
On another wall, it is nature’s lore that draws customers to Chuck Forman’s sporting watercolors. The consummate outdoorsman translates his aesthetic in an array of colors highlighting shimmering water, the scenic character and activities of Michigan coastal living. Accustomed to the proximity of lakes, woods and wildlife, Forman has developed a deep reverence for animals and their natural habitats. His watercolors are bright essences of local scenes and wild places.
Art & Soul Gallery is an ideal playground for shedding stresses and enjoying a feast of cultivated novelty. Without pristine walls or an overblown cerebral context, there is a special efflorescence to this relocated gallery. The extensive collection is a celebration of diversity, color and craftsmanship.
 
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