Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Birds of a feather flock...
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Birds of a feather flock together at Sturgeon Bay Pottery

Kristi Kates - April 28th, 2005
With a beautiful view, plenty of new merchandise coming in, and a fully-equipped pottery studio upstairs, Sturgeon River Pottery is just about ready for summer 2005.
Tucked back beneath somes trees just off Charlevoix Avenue between Petoskey and Bay Harbor, Sturgeon River Pottery was founded in 1980 by Karen and Steve Andrews, but began its life about 25 miles east of its current location in Karen’s first pottery studio on the banks of the Sturgeon River. Their first building was actually a gas station that the duo converted into their workshop/gallery.
Karen and Steve’s pottery quickly became popular; they rapidly outgrew their first location, and moved to Bay Shore. Little did they know that they’d get such a large following and would have to move their business yet again. In 1985, the Andrews moved to their current location, revisiting the conversion theme of their first studio by renovating a farm, including a tractor stall that became the gallery. Just a few years later, the store was expanded even more to make room for the wild bird supplies that Karen and Steve also like so much.

BIRD SANCTUARY
One really doesn’t know where to look first upon arriving at Sturgeon River Pottery, and this is a good thing. The rustic main building and outer front courtyard are chock-full of colorful items, some still and sturdy and some moving with the slightest breeze, including some live “items” that aren’t for sale - a whole host of chirping birds that appear to be regular patrons of the Andrews’ business, taking full advantage of the birdfeeders hung generously on the property.
“This is a good time of year to prepare for a lot of the seasonal birds that are coming back,” manager Lisa Russell says, “we’ve already had people spotting bluebirds and Baltimore orioles, and the hummingbirds will be back soon, as well.”
Several new birding items are expected for this year’s birding season, to join Sturgeon River’s already extensive inventory - they’ve got birdfeeders and birdbaths, bird books and bird guides, and, of course, bird houses.
“This is the time of year when courtship happens for birds,” Russell chuckles, “which also makes it the perfect time of year to put birdhouses out!” And Sturgeon River can help birding enthusiasts, from the beginner to the expert, with their price range for birdfeeders running from $5 to almost $200. “We’ve got pretty much everything a backyard birder could ever need,” Russell says.
To further enhance your outdoor areas, there are all kinds of garden items, from Amish-crafted furniture to gazing balls, wind chimes, garden sculptures, stepping stones, bright outdoor banners, copper sculptures, fountains, outdoor clocks and thermometers, gardening books, birdfeeder stands, and so much more - they’ve even got squirrel baffles “to keep ‘em off” the birdfeeders, and squirrel feeders, “to feed ‘em on purpose!” Indoors, you’ll find an even more eclectic mix of things displayed throughout the rambling building, much of it hand-made by the Andrews themselves.

POTTERY STUDIO
“The Andrews’ pottery studio is located right upstairs,” Russell points out, “and we often invite our customers to come on up and watch pottery being thrown.” There’s a beautiful view of Lake Michigan from the upstairs studio, which must help inspire the Andrews’ equally beautiful work, which is on display all over the store. One of Karen Andrews’ most popular items is a pretty blue and green glaze - the two artisans often introduce new colors and patterns to their pottery lines - and it’s easy to see why their work is collected all over Northern Michigan and beyond. They also offer the work of many fellow potters, including standout Ayers Pottery from Missouri, with their green-blue-red pattern that melts to an earthy brown - over a dozen additional artisans are represented in all - and that’s just the pottery.
“We’re a big gift destination,” Russell explains, “as we have a lot of unusual items from many different artists, and they all make unique and wonderful gifts.” In addition to the wild bird supplies, the garden items, the furniture, and the pottery, they also offer a funky line of quirky Petoskey Stone jewelry, a great homage to Michigan’s State Stone as crafted by Anne Thrush. There are nifty calendars from See-North (one of Northern Michigan’s great environmental organizations). Intriguing “Tree of Life” sculptures, made of copper and steamed and bent wood, are scattered throughout the display areas. And there’s even more - jewelry, metal art, notecards, polished Petoskey Stones (“one of the largest selections in Northern Michigan!”), candles and candle holders, wood carvings, stained glass - we could go on and on, but the best way for you to find out even more about Sturgeon River Pottery and Wild Bird Supply is to simply stop by and discover it all for yourself.


Sturgeon River Pottery and Wild Bird Supply is located at 3031 Charlevoix Avenue, halfway between Petoskey and Bay Harbor. Telephone 231-347-0590, or visit their extensive website online at www.sturgeonriver.com
 
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