Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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Birds of a feather flock together at Sturgeon Bay Pottery

Kristi Kates - April 28th, 2005
With a beautiful view, plenty of new merchandise coming in, and a fully-equipped pottery studio upstairs, Sturgeon River Pottery is just about ready for summer 2005.
Tucked back beneath somes trees just off Charlevoix Avenue between Petoskey and Bay Harbor, Sturgeon River Pottery was founded in 1980 by Karen and Steve Andrews, but began its life about 25 miles east of its current location in Karen’s first pottery studio on the banks of the Sturgeon River. Their first building was actually a gas station that the duo converted into their workshop/gallery.
Karen and Steve’s pottery quickly became popular; they rapidly outgrew their first location, and moved to Bay Shore. Little did they know that they’d get such a large following and would have to move their business yet again. In 1985, the Andrews moved to their current location, revisiting the conversion theme of their first studio by renovating a farm, including a tractor stall that became the gallery. Just a few years later, the store was expanded even more to make room for the wild bird supplies that Karen and Steve also like so much.

One really doesn’t know where to look first upon arriving at Sturgeon River Pottery, and this is a good thing. The rustic main building and outer front courtyard are chock-full of colorful items, some still and sturdy and some moving with the slightest breeze, including some live “items” that aren’t for sale - a whole host of chirping birds that appear to be regular patrons of the Andrews’ business, taking full advantage of the birdfeeders hung generously on the property.
“This is a good time of year to prepare for a lot of the seasonal birds that are coming back,” manager Lisa Russell says, “we’ve already had people spotting bluebirds and Baltimore orioles, and the hummingbirds will be back soon, as well.”
Several new birding items are expected for this year’s birding season, to join Sturgeon River’s already extensive inventory - they’ve got birdfeeders and birdbaths, bird books and bird guides, and, of course, bird houses.
“This is the time of year when courtship happens for birds,” Russell chuckles, “which also makes it the perfect time of year to put birdhouses out!” And Sturgeon River can help birding enthusiasts, from the beginner to the expert, with their price range for birdfeeders running from $5 to almost $200. “We’ve got pretty much everything a backyard birder could ever need,” Russell says.
To further enhance your outdoor areas, there are all kinds of garden items, from Amish-crafted furniture to gazing balls, wind chimes, garden sculptures, stepping stones, bright outdoor banners, copper sculptures, fountains, outdoor clocks and thermometers, gardening books, birdfeeder stands, and so much more - they’ve even got squirrel baffles “to keep ‘em off” the birdfeeders, and squirrel feeders, “to feed ‘em on purpose!” Indoors, you’ll find an even more eclectic mix of things displayed throughout the rambling building, much of it hand-made by the Andrews themselves.

“The Andrews’ pottery studio is located right upstairs,” Russell points out, “and we often invite our customers to come on up and watch pottery being thrown.” There’s a beautiful view of Lake Michigan from the upstairs studio, which must help inspire the Andrews’ equally beautiful work, which is on display all over the store. One of Karen Andrews’ most popular items is a pretty blue and green glaze - the two artisans often introduce new colors and patterns to their pottery lines - and it’s easy to see why their work is collected all over Northern Michigan and beyond. They also offer the work of many fellow potters, including standout Ayers Pottery from Missouri, with their green-blue-red pattern that melts to an earthy brown - over a dozen additional artisans are represented in all - and that’s just the pottery.
“We’re a big gift destination,” Russell explains, “as we have a lot of unusual items from many different artists, and they all make unique and wonderful gifts.” In addition to the wild bird supplies, the garden items, the furniture, and the pottery, they also offer a funky line of quirky Petoskey Stone jewelry, a great homage to Michigan’s State Stone as crafted by Anne Thrush. There are nifty calendars from See-North (one of Northern Michigan’s great environmental organizations). Intriguing “Tree of Life” sculptures, made of copper and steamed and bent wood, are scattered throughout the display areas. And there’s even more - jewelry, metal art, notecards, polished Petoskey Stones (“one of the largest selections in Northern Michigan!”), candles and candle holders, wood carvings, stained glass - we could go on and on, but the best way for you to find out even more about Sturgeon River Pottery and Wild Bird Supply is to simply stop by and discover it all for yourself.

Sturgeon River Pottery and Wild Bird Supply is located at 3031 Charlevoix Avenue, halfway between Petoskey and Bay Harbor. Telephone 231-347-0590, or visit their extensive website online at www.sturgeonriver.com
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