Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · Bicentennial Barn
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Bicentennial Barn

- September 1st, 2005
For nearly 30 years motorists have thrilled to the sight of the Bicentenniel Barn on M-22 near Port Oneida, north of Glen Arbor in Leelanau County. But the paint on this nationally-recognized art treasure owned by Susan Shields has faded almost entirely away, so volunteers are being sought for its restoration. This weekend, Sept. 3-5, volunteers are being sought for scraping, painting, structural support, carpentry and other fix-ups. Musicians are also being sought to entertain the volunteers. Anyone logging 10 hours of volunteer time becomes a “Barn Buddy” and will be invited to a volunteer picnic on September 5, as well as a gala celebration of the completed project, slated for July 4, 2006. In October there will be a contest for a painting on the barn‘s north side. If you‘d like to lend a hand, contact Bill Dungjen via email at bill@lakeshoretitle.net or visit www.restorethebarn.org. Or, just show up, beginning at noon, Sept. 3-5.

ON A ROLL: Members of TART (Traverse Area Recreation Trails) celebrated a new trail extension along the railroad right-of-way between Lautner Road and M-72 East in Acme last week. Combined with roadside improvments along Bunker Hill Road, the new trail will link the Grand Traverse Resort, Vasa Trailhead, and Williamsburg areas to the trail network in Traverse City. Work is also well underway on a new trail along the east side of Boardman Lake, running south from the district library.

HOMEGROWN TALENT Liz Ahrens has been named Executive Director of the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey after being determined as best choice for the position out of candidates from all over the Midwest. Liz replaces retiring director Dale Hull.
Crooked Tree‘s search committee said Ahren‘s leadership and communication skills, drive and passion for the arts in her role as PR Director made her the best choice to guide the arts center.
HATS OFF to local musicians Mike Moran and Brian Whitscell, who won top honors in the 2005 Michigan Songwriters Contest.
Mike Moran won second place with “I Can’t Make Everybody Happy,” and Brian Whitscell won third for “All I’ll Ever Ask,” which he co-wrote with David Runyan of Bellaire. Kelly Shively of Petoskey also won an honorable mention for “And the People Danced.”
Moran has performed throughout the Midwest, opening for Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson. He was named “Best New Artist” by Northern Express readers in 2004. His winning song was also named “Best Song of the Month” in November 2004 by Songwriters’ Universe of Los Angeles.
Runyan and Whitscell started writing songs together about seven years ago. Their songs have been featured on “Northern Michigan Rocks, Vol. 1-3,“ produced by WKLT-FM. Both Dave and Brian are professional sound engineers.The contest drew about 500 entries from across the state, competing for 13 prizes.

A group of adventurers in the Upper Peninsula are making a trek by kayak, canoe and on foot from Lake Superior to Lake Michigan‘s Green Bay to raise awareness of the threat that metallic sulfide mining poses to Great Lakes Waters.
Here, Rob Cadmus explains the headwaters route within the McCormick Wilderness of the Ottawa National Forest.
Plans for sulfide mining could flush the region‘s watersheds with sulfuric acid, say members of Northwoods Wilderness Recovery and the Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition. In addition to damaging the region‘s rivers, streams and wetlands, the flow of acid could impact the Great Lakes.
But the infusion of mining jobs is an incentive to many in the U.P., even if they last only a predicted seven years.
Activists claim the jobs incentive is a “boom & bust“ gambit that will harm the U.P. in the long run by damaging the environment and tourism.
 
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