Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · Bicentennial Barn
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Bicentennial Barn

- September 1st, 2005
For nearly 30 years motorists have thrilled to the sight of the Bicentenniel Barn on M-22 near Port Oneida, north of Glen Arbor in Leelanau County. But the paint on this nationally-recognized art treasure owned by Susan Shields has faded almost entirely away, so volunteers are being sought for its restoration. This weekend, Sept. 3-5, volunteers are being sought for scraping, painting, structural support, carpentry and other fix-ups. Musicians are also being sought to entertain the volunteers. Anyone logging 10 hours of volunteer time becomes a “Barn Buddy” and will be invited to a volunteer picnic on September 5, as well as a gala celebration of the completed project, slated for July 4, 2006. In October there will be a contest for a painting on the barn‘s north side. If you‘d like to lend a hand, contact Bill Dungjen via email at bill@lakeshoretitle.net or visit www.restorethebarn.org. Or, just show up, beginning at noon, Sept. 3-5.

ON A ROLL: Members of TART (Traverse Area Recreation Trails) celebrated a new trail extension along the railroad right-of-way between Lautner Road and M-72 East in Acme last week. Combined with roadside improvments along Bunker Hill Road, the new trail will link the Grand Traverse Resort, Vasa Trailhead, and Williamsburg areas to the trail network in Traverse City. Work is also well underway on a new trail along the east side of Boardman Lake, running south from the district library.

HOMEGROWN TALENT Liz Ahrens has been named Executive Director of the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey after being determined as best choice for the position out of candidates from all over the Midwest. Liz replaces retiring director Dale Hull.
Crooked Tree‘s search committee said Ahren‘s leadership and communication skills, drive and passion for the arts in her role as PR Director made her the best choice to guide the arts center.
HATS OFF to local musicians Mike Moran and Brian Whitscell, who won top honors in the 2005 Michigan Songwriters Contest.
Mike Moran won second place with “I Can’t Make Everybody Happy,” and Brian Whitscell won third for “All I’ll Ever Ask,” which he co-wrote with David Runyan of Bellaire. Kelly Shively of Petoskey also won an honorable mention for “And the People Danced.”
Moran has performed throughout the Midwest, opening for Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson. He was named “Best New Artist” by Northern Express readers in 2004. His winning song was also named “Best Song of the Month” in November 2004 by Songwriters’ Universe of Los Angeles.
Runyan and Whitscell started writing songs together about seven years ago. Their songs have been featured on “Northern Michigan Rocks, Vol. 1-3,“ produced by WKLT-FM. Both Dave and Brian are professional sound engineers.The contest drew about 500 entries from across the state, competing for 13 prizes.

A group of adventurers in the Upper Peninsula are making a trek by kayak, canoe and on foot from Lake Superior to Lake Michigan‘s Green Bay to raise awareness of the threat that metallic sulfide mining poses to Great Lakes Waters.
Here, Rob Cadmus explains the headwaters route within the McCormick Wilderness of the Ottawa National Forest.
Plans for sulfide mining could flush the region‘s watersheds with sulfuric acid, say members of Northwoods Wilderness Recovery and the Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition. In addition to damaging the region‘s rivers, streams and wetlands, the flow of acid could impact the Great Lakes.
But the infusion of mining jobs is an incentive to many in the U.P., even if they last only a predicted seven years.
Activists claim the jobs incentive is a “boom & bust“ gambit that will harm the U.P. in the long run by damaging the environment and tourism.
 
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