Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The return of the dress...
. . . .

The return of the dress code

George Foster - November 3rd, 2005
It is about time someone put their foot down and forced those gangsta’ professional athletes to clean up their act. Right?
When NBA commissioner David Stern indicated that a dress code would be instituted for all NBA players in public, requiring a collared shirt, sport coat, and no jeans - many fans rejoiced. Predictably, though, a majority of players groaned.
It will be interesting to see how the notoriously dressed-down Allen Iverson of the Philadelphia 76ers will react. Soon, he will not have the freedom to wear his do-rag, chains, baggy shirts and pants, and expose his numerous tattoos on the streets as his peers do.
David Stern must know what he is doing, though. By emulating Iverson and others, can you imagine millions of kids in the inner-cities discarding their hip-hop attire while aspiring to buy expensive Armani suits? Expect gangs and the drug-culture to soon evaporate as a result of basketball celebrities’ conversion to the GQ look.
Don’t worry, though, we don’t have to worry about the prospect of an army of identical business-types marching around everywhere, because only the affluent can afford to buy expensive formal clothes. Economic divisions in American society will be emphasized more than ever, but at least some of us will appear clean-cut and professional.
David Stern probably realizes that many of us want the NBA and society in general to return to that bygone era of the fifties when pro players were proud to dress in business suits and speak humbly in public.
That was a glorious era when players had no say in which team employed them, African-Americans were allowed to play only grudgingly, and each player was forced into accepting any subsistence-level salary offered by management. Oh, those were the days, my friend.

Dress codes remind me of my school days in the 1960s.
I remember the boys who attended the local Catholic schools were each forced to wear a white shirt and dark pants on the school grounds. Many of them stuffed that damn white shirt in a locker at the end of each day and finally brought the school uniform home on the last day of each school year for its annual washing. My Catholic buddies took great pride in how stiff and discolored their shirts became over the school year.
In my own case, I remember the exact moment I took an interest in my clothes - it was on the 8th grade basketball court. I was wearing a yellow, cotton shirt that exposed sweat rings under my arms to the entire student population. For a couple of years, I imagined everyone was discussing my adult-like body odor and vowed to wear shirts that hid perspiration stains and to sit at the back of each classroom. I don’t remember liking Junior High School much.
Since then, except for a bizarre period when I enjoyed wearing only 3-piece wool suits with silk ties, I have strived for comfort in my clothing ensembles. Other than the urgent fashion consulting of my mother, sister, and now my wife, I feel fortunate to live in an era without Nazi-like dress standards.
There is nothing wrong with dressing up, but David Stern is part of a bygone era that believes clothing defines a person’s character. So, before enacting any dress code, he should be forced to wear the same white shirt day after day after day...

 
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