Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Crossroads
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Crossroads

Robert Downes - November 3rd, 2005
Author of Aaron’s Crossing looks to broader horizon
It’s been a thrilling year for author Linda Alice Dewey, whose first book, “Aaron’s Crossing,” has received a blizzard of publicity from Michigan’s press since she penned the 232-page manuscript a year ago about her encounter with a ghost in an old cemetary near Glen Arbor.
Much of that is due to Dewey’s considerable hustle: sending out waves of press kits and review copies, establishing a an elaborate website, and generating stories and reviews in more than a dozen newspapers and magazines, including the Detroit Free Press.
But a savvy P.R. campaign alone doesn’t move books, and it’s obvious from the ascendency of “Aaron’s Crossing” as a regional bestseller that Dewey has struck a nerve with local readers.  She’s sold out her first run of 3,000 books, primarily through test marketing the novel/memoir in northwestern lower Michigan, and now she’s heading for broader horizons.   Currently, she’s preparing for a downstate tour of Ann Arbor, Gross Pointe and Kalamazoo, followed by a national push this January through California, Arizona and onward.
Somewhere down the road, she hopes for an international bestseller, possibly a musical and a film, and definitely a follow-up book.  

MOVING ON UP
In the meantime, the challenge for Dewey is growing acceptance of “Aaron’s Crossing” nationwide.  “The problem when you’re working with a small publishing company is that if you get on ‘Oprah,’ you’d better have the stock out there for the readers,” she notes.
But having the sizzle provides half the recipe of success, and at that end of the kitchen, Dewey has managed to tantalize readers.  “’Ghost Whisperer’ is one of the hottest shows on TV right now, and that’s just what I did,” she says with a laugh.
That brings us to the plot of “Aaron’s Crossing” and how Dewey got involved.  Born in Detroit and raised in a metaphysically-oriented family, Dewey practices a technique called “spiritual listening.”
Basically, that means tuning in to the voices of folks who are trapped in the afterlife in the form of ghosts.
“I grew up with a fascination for it,” she says of her spiritual sensitivity.  “And I think a lot of people have have a fascination possibly have a gift for it as well, like those people who have a deep fascination for music.  It wasn’t until I really started investigating deeper that I developed some skills.”
That was in 1987 before she began co-facilitating a spiritual listening group in Glen Arbor.  It was in 1991 that Dewey came across a 100-year-old cemetary where she began sensing the presence of Aaron Burke, a long-dead Irish farm worker.  Aaron’s story gradually unfolded in Dewey’s thoughts: he claimed to have been kidnapped at the age of four by his father and brought to America.  Years later, he abandoned his own children after the death of his wife to live a fairly miserable, solitary experience as a farm laborer. Killed in an accident, Aaron lingered on in
ghostville until Dewey established contact with him
and set him free of his guilty, grief-stricken burden.

LISTEN CLOSE
“Aaron’s Crossing” is meant to be a heart-warming, uplifting tale of redemption, rather than a bloodcurdling ghost story.  Needless to say, this is also a tale for true believers willing to be seduced by Aaron’s credibility.
All of which leads to the question of how spiritual listening is done:
“What I learned to do -- and I have to say a word of caution because there’s all kinds of stuff out there -- but what I do is clear a place in my mind for it and ask for divine protection or say a prayer,” Dewey recounts.  “And I clear my thoughts and the words will come in.  You can think you’re imagining things, but the way you can tell you’re not is that you’ll receive words and concepts that are not your own.  It’s what we call the Work with a capital W -- spiritual Work.”
Working with ghosts requires keeping a lid on things.
“You really have to put boundaries on contact with ghosts because they don’t have boundaries and limits themselves and they’re desperate,” she notes.
Dewey has had other encounters with ghosts since receiving Aaron’s tale and has indeed had to impose limits on the process if only because of the busy task of marketing her book.
Speaking of which, one of the pleasant side effects of her booksignings is that she has received dozens of stories from fans of their own encounters with the Other Side.  Such as that of a woman who lives on Torch Lake near the purported site of an Indian uprising years ago, who gathers spectacular pictures of spooky visions at night.
Does she plan to have a follow-up book to “Aaron’s Crossing,” based on the many anecdotes she’s gathered?
“Definitely,” she says.  “Whenever I go to a signing I have a file folder of releases and a tape recorder and I try to follow up on the phone.  That’s what Dr. Raymond Moody did in the ‘70s, gathering life-after-life experiences.  People  usually don’t want to talk about these things because our culture is very closed to spiritual matters.  The rise of science in the 1900s made us throw away the knowing of such things, but that was like tossing the baby out with the bathwater.”
Whether you believe in ghosts or not, much less being able to communicate with them telepathically, there’s no denying that Linda Alice Dewey spins a good yarn and is an engaging live wire.  And it’s nice to know that somewhere, poor Aaron is smiling as news of his redemption climbs up the bestseller charts.

 
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