Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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Start Stompin‘

Rick Coates - December 8th, 2005
Snowshoeing has been enjoying increased popularity. Last year and estimated seven million Americans went snowshoeing compared to 3.5 million in 1998. Why the renewed interesting snowshoeing?
“Snowshoes are great fun and after your first five steps you are an expert,” said Ben Carr of the Michigan Snowshoe Center in Roscommon. “The great thing about snowshoeing is anyone can do it, whether you are two or 92.”
Prior to 1900 snowshoeing was the primary mode of winter transportation in the north country, but roads, SUV, snowmobiles and television all contributed to its demise during the past 100 years. Its renewed popularity is attributed to various factors, including health benefits, it is easy to learn, its affordability, hikers wanting to explore trails not accessible with cross-country ski’s and runners wanting to stay in shape during the winter months.
“We are seeing an increased number of runners getting into snowshoeing,” said Jeff Gaft of Running Fit in Traverse City. “There are several manufacturer’s making snowshoes for trail running and competitive snowshoe events are also gaining in popularity.
Gaft and other staffers of Running Fit will again be organizing the “Bigfoot” Snowshoe Race, January 26, 2008. This year’s race will serve as the Midwest regional qualifier for the 2006 National Championships; top finishers will compete in the national championships this March in St. Lake City, Utah.
While competitive snowshoeing is gaining in popularity it represents only a small portion of the growing snowshoe community.
“What we offer over here at the Michigan Snowshoe Center is recreational snowshoeing,” said Carr, whose facility is surrounded by trails along the south branch of the Ausable River. “It is a great activity and makes parts of Northern Michigan accessible that otherwise would be off limits during winter months.”
Carr also emphasis that snowshoeing is a great family activity and one of the few winter activities that “you can hold your spouses hand.”
Snowshoeing is affordable and a variety of “shoe” styles are available ranging in price from $75 to $350. Bob McLain of McLain Cycle in Traverse City suggests “renting snowshoes first or trying snowshoes at several manufacturers demo days,” before purchasing. Styles vary depending on what type of snowshoeing planned (hiking or running), height & weight, and shoes are available for kids as well with prices between $30 and $100.
Tim Brick at Brick Wheels in Traverse City has seen snowshoe rentals increase at his 8th Street location every year since they started renting snowshoes 15 years ago. His staff is knowledgeable and they always have the latest skinny on the best trails to explore for first-timers.

WOODIES
The old style, wooden “Michigan” snowshoes are still available for the traditionalist, but they have given way to various lightweight, heavy-duty aluminum frame styles. Bindings also vary so visiting with your local outfitter, outdoor or running shop is the best way to get fitted for the “shoe” that will best meet your needs.
Snowshoeing opens up a lot of trails and enables the hiker or runner access to areas off-limits to snowmobiles and even skiers.
It provides a great opportunity to enjoy the winter months and explore northern Michigan’s beauty. There are several events planned throughout Northern Michigan for the novice and the expert:

WEEKLY HIKES & RUNS: Several local shops that sell snowshoes organize weekly and bi-weekly walks and runs. Many have demo shoes and welcome newcomers to experience the excitement. These weekly events take place in Traverse City, Petoskey, Leelanau County, Roscommon and Gaylord. Call your local snowshoe shop for further details. The Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes offer guided hikes on weekends (1 pm on Saturday and Sundays) and reservations are required 231-326-5135 ext. 328.

WINTER TRAILS DAY: January 7, 2006 at the Michigan Snowshoe Center. This is a national event in its seventh year to promote snowshoe activities. The day consists of seminars, guided tours, and activities for kids. The American Hiking Society sponsors the event and several snowshoe manufacturing reps will be on hand with demos. For additional information call (866) 275-0300 or visit the official website at www.wintertrails.org

BIGFOOT SNOWSHOE RACE: January 28, 2006. Part of the U.S. National Snowshoe Championship series. 5 & 10 K runs at the Tubbs Adventure Snowshoe course located at Timber Ridge Campground in Traverse City. For additional info call Running Fit (231) 933-9342 or visit www.runsnow.com

TUBBS ADVENTURE SNOWHOE: Feburary 5, 2006. This event is part of the Subaru Madeline Thomas Memorial Women’s Ski Tour. Ladies may choose the snowshoe 3K, 5K or 7K snowshoeing in lieu of the cross-country ski event. For additional information visit www.womensskitour.com or call 231-360-0661.

TASTE THE PASSION SNOWSHOE STOMP: February 18, 2006. A run or hike through the Leelanau Peninsula Vineyards. Particpants may choose from a 4-mile competitive run or a 2-mile fun run or hike through vineyards, woods and orchards overlooking West Bay.
For additional info call (231) 938-1811or
visit www.lpwines.com

THE SNOW MONKEY: February 25, 2006. Competitive snowshoe race. For futher information call Running Fit (231) 933-9342.

SNOWSHOE NIGHT HIKES: McLain’s will again offer their popular “night hikes” at the former State Hospital grounds in Traverse City (behind Munson Hospital, Parking Lot K.) Hikes are every Wednesday night starting January 4, 2006 at 6:30 pm and continue till the snow is gone. For additional details call McLain Cycle (231) 941-8855. The Shielding Tree Nature Center also organizes moonlight hikes through the Sleeping Bear Sand Dune trails, for a schedule call them at
231-334-7649.

Get with it this winter, try a pair of snowshoes, it is easy, fun and affordable. Whether you just want to cross the street to get your mail, hike a trail, or go for a jog, snowshoeing will add to your winter enjoyment.

 
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