Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · The Great Generic Drug...
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The Great Generic Drug Rip-off: Michigan Legislature Works to Keep Prescription Drug Costs Artificially High

Margaret Dodd - April 1st, 2004
Since I am considering a run for the 104th District, I have been looking into various issues of concern to me and to the area as a whole. Among these of course, is the retention and addition of good paying jobs. To get the information I wanted first hand, I’ve met with employers in both the public and private sectors to ask what changes they thought should take place at the State level to achieve this goal. At some point in every conversation the spiraling costs of health care came up. Having heard of a downstate investigation into excessive retail pharmacy mark-ups of generic drugs, I enlisted the help of friends to check the cost of seven common generic drugs at several local pharmacies.
The range of pricing is astonishing, even if pharmacies deal with different wholesalers whose prices could be higher than those stated. Unless some good reason can be given for windfall profits of 3000% above wholesale, some pharmacies are displaying an unconscionable disregard for the well-being of those who can least afford to be ripped off – the elderly, the unemployed, and anyone who is struggling to pay for their prescription medicine.
I had originally planned to wait and see what happened to legislation drafted by the chairman of the State House Committee on Health Policy, State Rep. Stephen Ehardt (R), who owns four drug stores. The proposed legislation is designed to protect Michigan pharmacies from competition from out-of-state, mail-order drug companies, and the results of the survey could have added another fine plank to my platform should I decide to run.
However, I just picked up my mother’s prescription and met an elderly lady who had to leave the drug store empty-handed because she couldn’t afford her necessary medication. The information is therefore too important to wait till the most opportune time for my political purpose, so here it is. It certainly helps to explain some of the problems facing local employers who could perhaps afford to hire more employees or increase wages if such exorbitant prescription mark-ups were eliminated.
Consider the wholesale cost of a generic form of Prozac (called Fluoxetine HCL) compared to what you must pay at the drugstore, for instance. Wholesalers charge drugstores $1.16 for 30 doses of 20mg each of Prozac, or .082 cents for its generic counterpart.
What do you pay for the same drug? At Meijer‘s Pharmacy, it‘s $17.99, or a markup of 2,193%; at Rite Aid Pharmacy, you‘ll pay $24.99, or a mark-up of 3,247%; at Wal-Mart Pharmacy the cost is $17.72, or a mark-up of 2,087%. Only at the far smaller drugstore at Sixth Street Drugs in Traverse City is the cost much lower at $11.05, yet still with a mark-up of 1,348%.
Shame on the big name pharmacies, but at least we now know where to shop.
 
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