Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Its always Toyland at Toy...
. . . .

Its always Toyland at Toy Harbor

Mary Bevans Gillett - December 8th, 2005
In an era of big box megastores and high tech playthings, Toy Harbor in downtown Traverse City continues sailing its classic craft through shifting retail waters. Its commitment to creative, quality toys has successfully stayed the course for 21 years.  
“We believe in the diversity of creativity and strive to find the playthings that encourage it,” said Nancy Walton, owner and co-founder.  
A stroll through Toy Harbor conjures up memories of childhood toy stores along with the anticipation and excitement that those visits to such a fantasyland would generate. No shopping carts, computer games or blue light specials, just floor to ceiling shelves filled with the tools that spark imagination – bins filled with knights in shining armor, dolls with shimmering curls, Legos and building sets, creative crafts and science adventures, puppets, horses, dinosaurs, books, puzzles and games.  
“The value of play is limitless,” Walton said, noting the shop’s emphasis on toys with creative value.  “Communication skills begin at a young age…in this era of technology and instant gratification, it’s important to take the space and time to play,”
Many of Toy Harbor’s items are classics that have stood the test of time – Legos, Erector sets, wooden toys, board games, craft sets, beautiful dolls and Breyer horses.  Their timeless attraction links the generations.  
While its core values have remained the same, Toy Harbor has come a long way since five friends lamented the difficulty in finding creative, hands-on toys for their young children in the early 1980s. That need inspired Walton and co-founder Mimi Bruder to create the shop which opened its doors on Labor Day weekend 1984.  
“It was daunting,” Walton said.  She and Bruder were among downtown’s first women business owners, and with her degree in landscape architecture and Bruder’s in social work, were somewhat naïve in the business of retail.  They compensated for lack of experience with enthusiasm and planning, carving a solid niche for their growing enterprise.
“We certainly operated on a shoestring,” Walton said.  “Inventory was purchased in twos and threes…’one to show, and one to go! We’re certainly much larger today.”
“But our focus and commitment has remained strong….specialized service, a knowledgeable staff and age appropriate toys of quality, longevity and consequence.”
Today, Toy Harbor employs 12 staff during peak seasons and features products from over 250 companies. Still an independent toy store, it has held its own against the region’s growing number of “big box” competitors by continuing to offer high levels of service and expertise.  Customers include a loyal community following as well as tourists and visitors.  As the shop enters its third decade, past patrons are returning in new roles as parents and grandparents.
“Parents will come in with little children and tell us how they remember coming to Toy Harbor when they were young….or others who are back because they’re grandparents now.”  
Many of the faces behind the counter are as familiar as the blue Toy Harbor aprons they wear. Manager Leslie Ansted has been on board for over 20 years while others also have many years under their belts.  It’s not unusual for teens who work part-time in high school to return during college breaks or after becoming young mothers.  Co-workers as well as customers acknowledge the family-like camaraderie as one of the shop’s hallmarks. 
Walton credits her staff as essential to Toy Harbor’s success and longevity.  
“I’ve been so lucky to have the staff that I have…I rely heavily on each and every one of them,” Walton said, noting their shared commitment to Toy Harbor’s standards and service. 
“They are (Toy Harbor’s) spokespeople…they have the responsibility to be very knowledgeable about our products and to convey that information to our customers,” she said.  “And they do it beautifully…whether it’s placing a special order or gift wrapping or helping a customer find just the right toy… I know they are in good hands.”
Toy Harbor is located in downtown Traverse City at 221 East Front St. Holiday hours are 10 am-9 pm, Monday through Saturday and 11 am-5 pm on Sundays. For more info, call (231) 946-1131.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close