Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Its always Toyland at Toy...
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Its always Toyland at Toy Harbor

Mary Bevans Gillett - December 8th, 2005
In an era of big box megastores and high tech playthings, Toy Harbor in downtown Traverse City continues sailing its classic craft through shifting retail waters. Its commitment to creative, quality toys has successfully stayed the course for 21 years.  
“We believe in the diversity of creativity and strive to find the playthings that encourage it,” said Nancy Walton, owner and co-founder.  
A stroll through Toy Harbor conjures up memories of childhood toy stores along with the anticipation and excitement that those visits to such a fantasyland would generate. No shopping carts, computer games or blue light specials, just floor to ceiling shelves filled with the tools that spark imagination – bins filled with knights in shining armor, dolls with shimmering curls, Legos and building sets, creative crafts and science adventures, puppets, horses, dinosaurs, books, puzzles and games.  
“The value of play is limitless,” Walton said, noting the shop’s emphasis on toys with creative value.  “Communication skills begin at a young age…in this era of technology and instant gratification, it’s important to take the space and time to play,”
Many of Toy Harbor’s items are classics that have stood the test of time – Legos, Erector sets, wooden toys, board games, craft sets, beautiful dolls and Breyer horses.  Their timeless attraction links the generations.  
While its core values have remained the same, Toy Harbor has come a long way since five friends lamented the difficulty in finding creative, hands-on toys for their young children in the early 1980s. That need inspired Walton and co-founder Mimi Bruder to create the shop which opened its doors on Labor Day weekend 1984.  
“It was daunting,” Walton said.  She and Bruder were among downtown’s first women business owners, and with her degree in landscape architecture and Bruder’s in social work, were somewhat naïve in the business of retail.  They compensated for lack of experience with enthusiasm and planning, carving a solid niche for their growing enterprise.
“We certainly operated on a shoestring,” Walton said.  “Inventory was purchased in twos and threes…’one to show, and one to go! We’re certainly much larger today.”
“But our focus and commitment has remained strong….specialized service, a knowledgeable staff and age appropriate toys of quality, longevity and consequence.”
Today, Toy Harbor employs 12 staff during peak seasons and features products from over 250 companies. Still an independent toy store, it has held its own against the region’s growing number of “big box” competitors by continuing to offer high levels of service and expertise.  Customers include a loyal community following as well as tourists and visitors.  As the shop enters its third decade, past patrons are returning in new roles as parents and grandparents.
“Parents will come in with little children and tell us how they remember coming to Toy Harbor when they were young….or others who are back because they’re grandparents now.”  
Many of the faces behind the counter are as familiar as the blue Toy Harbor aprons they wear. Manager Leslie Ansted has been on board for over 20 years while others also have many years under their belts.  It’s not unusual for teens who work part-time in high school to return during college breaks or after becoming young mothers.  Co-workers as well as customers acknowledge the family-like camaraderie as one of the shop’s hallmarks. 
Walton credits her staff as essential to Toy Harbor’s success and longevity.  
“I’ve been so lucky to have the staff that I have…I rely heavily on each and every one of them,” Walton said, noting their shared commitment to Toy Harbor’s standards and service. 
“They are (Toy Harbor’s) spokespeople…they have the responsibility to be very knowledgeable about our products and to convey that information to our customers,” she said.  “And they do it beautifully…whether it’s placing a special order or gift wrapping or helping a customer find just the right toy… I know they are in good hands.”
Toy Harbor is located in downtown Traverse City at 221 East Front St. Holiday hours are 10 am-9 pm, Monday through Saturday and 11 am-5 pm on Sundays. For more info, call (231) 946-1131.


 
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