Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Nature‘s lesson in New Orleans

Tom Baily - September 29th, 2005
I write this column two days after Hurricane Katrina brought incalculable devastation to the Gulf Coast and the people of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. I spent last evening glued to the television as I was during the Gulf Wars and on September 11, 2001. Thousands of people need help. Trapped people need rescue. Water, food, shelter, sanitary facilities, and clothing are needed for the displaced and now homeless. Restoration of authority and civility is a priority.
I resist the urge to go to the scene. Having been a first responder in the past - Emergency Medical Technician, firefighter and search-and-rescue worker during my national park ranger days - there’s a temptation to pick up and go. But my last attempt at this sort of thing didn’t work out so well. Years ago, as the world responded to Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, I noted that the U.S. Navy was taking many vessels out of mothballs in order to deliver supplies and people for what would become the first Gulf War. I called to offer my services as a navigator and, upon providing details, I was politely told that I “exceeded the age requirements” and that the Navy, regrettably, could not accept my enlistment. I understood, perhaps wryly, that one’s time for “doing” in such situations may be limited.
More than a decade later, it is clear to me that the first-responders in the effort to help Katrina’s victims need to be younger and more fit than I. But one can sometimes offer help in other ways -- writing, speaking out and sharing lessons learned over the years.
I see an important - even vital - role for land conservation in rebuilding areas affected by the storm and subsequent floods. If land conservationists are allowed to help with the rebuilding, our contribution can assure that the effects of future hurricanes and floods will be much less dramatic and deadly.
While hurricanes bring high winds, much of the damage attributed to these storms comes from flooding due to heavy rain and storm surges that push ocean waters far inland. The unfolding tragedy on the Gulf Coast demonstrates how catastrophic this flooding can be. If land conservation is incorporated into rebuilding efforts, we can ensure that protected wetlands, coastal marshes, dunes, barrier islands, and other natural features will be in place to absorb the brunt of the next storm, to moderate the flow of flood waters, to buffer people from storm surges and to soften the blow of potentially deadly storms.
Wetlands act as sponges for runoff and reservoirs in times of flood. Coastal marshes act as shock absorbers for storm surge, waves, and high winds. Dunes and barrier islands, known to shift with the winds and tides, provide protection from these same storm surges, waves and winds. Natural areas provide natural protection from the ravages of intense storms - naturally.
As we contemplate the rebuilding of communities, homes, businesses, infrastructure and even the large casinos that once lined the Gulf shore, we should also be thinking about rebuilding the natural landscape. By allowing adequate space for barrier islands, large coastal marshes, and other natural areas, we can reduce the impacts of future storms and save billions in property damage, not to mention untold value to the people whose homes, businesses and very lives would be spared by having better natural storm buffers incorporated into our community.
One of the best features of such a plan is that once we decide to incorporate natural storm barriers into our landscape, Mother Nature does most of the work! By setting aside the proper areas and letting nature go to work, we can watch barrier islands and coastal marshes appear before our eyes.
As she has for millennia, Old Ma Nature will surely rebuild these important coastal features. All we need to do is to give her the space she needs to do it, and with just a little help from us, she’ll build natural structures that can protect us from the ravages of the next storm.
It is said that there is a time for everything, and here is magnificent opportunity for the Administration, Congress, the states and local governments to unite with the private sector and do some practical, economically sensible land conservation that will pay great dividends as a natural insulation against future disasters. This is not only practical conservation, it is sound economics, good government, and good politics.
Land conservation can play a vital role in ensuring that the tragic lessons of Katrina are not lost. After immediate human needs have been tended to, land conservationists should accompany insurance adjusters, engineers and others into the devastated areas to help with the rebuilding. We need land conservationists’ “boots on the ground” to designate areas that can be preserved to soak up torrential rains, deflect storm surges, and absorb the terrible winds of the next hurricane.
It will do little good to make blaming statements about what could have, should have, would have or might have been done to reduce the impact of the last storm and the terrible cost in life, property and human suffering. It is time to be positive. It is time to rebuild.
If we’re to do it right, land conservation must be part of the rebuilding. We should work with FEMA and the Corps of Engineers, federal flood insurance officials and others to ensure that natural storm buffers are incorporated into what is rebuilt in the devastated region. This will result not only in safer communities, but also more beautiful communities that CONTAIN natural areas, parks, and open spaces - spaces that double as life-saving protection from the fury of the storm.



 
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