Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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Coach Carter Takes on Petoskey

George Foster - February 24th, 2005
I hate sports movies.
And I never grow tired of startling friends by telling them so. Many of them know that I actually live for sports - either following or participating in baseball, basketball, hockey, football, skiing, boxing, distance running, etc. Yet, films, depicting sports, turn my stomach.
For example, Bull Durham was ranked the No. 1 sports movie of all time by ESPN- I found it silly and Kevin Costner totally unconvincing. Some have rated Raging Bull as the greatest movie of all time in any genre. To me, it seemed overly demeaning to women and DeNiro‘s performance was nothing but a bunch of mumbling gangster talk.
In Field of Dreams, Costner again bores us with his monotonous Kevin Costner imitation. Caddyshack wasn‘t funny for even a second. If you are one of those knuckleheads who enjoy laughing at the predictably stupid Bill Murray jokes, I suppose that doesn‘t make you a bad person.
The interminable Rocky movies epitomize everything that is bad about sports movies. Suffocating through a Stallone boxing melodrama should warrant a purple heart. Yo Adrian, not one round of the fight scenes was believable. Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed collapsing atop one another in a heap at the final bell - Lord help us.
For all of these reasons, when recently conned into seeing the box-office smash Coach Carter, I entered the theater with a major league attitude against the film. An underdog basketball team, coached by a disciplinarian ex-player back in the ‘hood - it has only been done about a dozen times by Hollywood.
Despite the predictability of this movie, I liked it. Since it was based on actual events during the coaching tenure of basketball coach Ken Carter at an inner city high school in California, the film was complete with issues of gang violence, drugs, and academic underachievement. As with much in life, the ending was also bittersweet.
The movie was not really about basketball. It left me moved by what one person can do to inspire others to perform beyond expectations. My girlfriend says I was tearing-up during a climatic scene that I won‘t give away if you haven‘t seen the film. I still say I was sweating from the previous fast-paced basketball sequences.
Whatever the case, most of us have bumped into people like Coach Carter during our lifetimes. What can be more compelling than someone who takes a lonely stand against conventional wisdom to stand up for principle and the capacity of each person to perform academically beyond limited expectations? The force of Carter‘s convictions helped some of his players attend college who might not have even completed high school.
If life were fair, teachers would be the ones earning million dollar contracts and endorsement deals, not jocks. The distractions and pressures on today‘s youth have put a premium on the already infinitesimal value of inspiring educators. Sports are drowning in good coaches and players. Excellent educators, like Ken Carter, are preciously few and today‘s real superstars.

Coach Ken Carter will join the lecture series at North Central Michigan College in Petoskey at 7:30 pm on March 2, 2005. Doors open at 6:45, admission is free, and the presentation will be held in the NCMC Student & Community Resource Center.




 
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