Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Gwen Frostic Left her Mark on...
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Gwen Frostic Left her Mark on Northern Michigan

- March 7th, 2002
Gwen Frostic passed from the earth one day shy of her 95th birthday last April 25, leaving a legacy of nature prints and verse which earned her the posthumous award of “Best Artist“ from readers of the Northern Express.
Born Sara Gwendolen Frostic on April 26, 1906 in Sandusky, Michigan, she was afflicted with a childhood illness which left her with a condition similar to cerebral palsy. She never considered herself handicapped, however; possibly because of a fierce streak of independence. That independence was nurtured in part by her embrace of Ayn Rand‘s philosophy of objectivism which exalts the individual spirit.
Frostic developed an early interest in art, growing up in the Thumb and the City of Wyandotte. She studied art education at Eastern Michigan University as well as Western Michigan University. Her work as a tool and die maker at the Willow Run bomber plant during World War II gave her experience with assembly line skills which were of use when she launched her Presscraft Papers company in Wyandotte in the late ‘40s.
A love of nature led her to Northern Michigan, where she established her studio and workshop in Benzonia during the early ‘50s. In 1964, she moved her printmaking operation to its hobbit-like home next to the Betsie River on River Road, where visitors still select from thousands of prints.
While Frostic had a gargantuan work ethic, she found solace and inspiration in nature. The 285-acre grounds around her studio/print shop resound with birdcalls as a result of the feeders and lush habitat along the river, and the vast bulk of her work is concerned with simply rendered depictions of birds, flowers, plants and animals, often with a tender, humorous touch.
She was, to quote her website:

“observer of - and part of - - -
the wondrous order of the universe
- - the rhythms of the seasons
- - the stars by night
- - sunsets and dawns
and all things that live and breath - -
wandered through fields and woods
stopping here and there to sketch a
blade of grass - - a bird - - - or a
leaf blown by the wind ...“

During the course of her lifetime she received many honorary degrees from colleges and universities around the state and country. In 1986 she was inducted into the Michigan Woman‘s Hall of Fame. Long before her death she wrote her epitaph:
“Here lies one doubly blessed.
She was happy and she knew it.“
 
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