Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Art in Public Places honors Eddi
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Art in Public Places honors Eddi

- July 14th, 2005
Art supporter, the late eddi Offield, has been honored by her friends in the creative community with the placement of a new ”Homage to eddi” sculpture in the Mitchell Street courtyard in Petoskey.
Michigan sculptor Paul Varga was commissioned in 2002 to create an original piece of art that would serve as the eddi Award. The Crooked Tree Arts Center presents the annual award to those who reflect the talent, energy and commitment of the late eddi Offield of Harbor Point.
Varga’s 500 lb. bronze figure, which serves as the model for the award, is one of seven “Art in Public Places” installations around the region.
Thus far, Moran Ironworks and Crooked Tree have installed a 1,500 lb bronze stag by artist Glen McCune at the Pellston Regional Airport, as well as a 4,000 lb stainless steel and brass butterfly by sculptor Tom Moran at the entrance to Northern Michigan Hospital.
The next four pieces in the project include a piece by the late Walter Midener, who served as director of the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit; Jim Miller-Malburg of Birmingham, Bill Allen of Traverse City, and David Petrakovitz of Cadillac.
“All of the pieces will be installed by the end of the month,” says Dale Hull, executive director of the Crooked Tree Arts Center. “The next four will be placed in Harbor Springs, Charlevoix, Boyne City, and East Jordan. We are just waiting for the bases to be completed so that we can deliver them to each of the sites.”
Each of the cement bases weighs about 13 tons.
The public art project was developed by the Crooked Tree staff in response to a recommendation outlined it the 1999 Emmet and Charlevoix County Community Cultural Plan.




Art of the Gourd

Linda McLirath, Laura Love and Joanne Springberg have a gourd thing going with their Gourgeous Gourds stand at the Farmer’s Market in Traverse City. Their whimsically painted gourds are perfect for hanging in the garden as birdhouses or planters.
Linda has been making art out of gourds for the past six years, growing a wide variety of the squash-like plants at her home north of Acme. Gourds are related to melons, squash, pumpkins, and cucumbers, all members of the cucurbitaceae or cucumber family. The plants have been raised for thousands of years and used as implements by many cultures, including the Native Americans.
Gourd descriptions represent endless possibilities. They include Aladdin’s Turban, Bird House, Long Handle Dipper, Crown of Thorns, Large Bottle, Calabash, Striped Pear, Caveman’s Club, Miniature Ball, Cannon Ball, Bushel, Swan or Dolphin, Flat Striped, Martin House, White Egg, Wren House, Small Spoon and many more. A warm-weather crop, gourds typically require a growing season of 100-180 days.
Gourgeous Gourds are painted in swirling honeysuckles, tomatoes, roses, strawberries and other naturalistic motifs. Some are quite big: a morning glory gourd on their website at www.geocities.com/heartland/flats/3471 measures 14” tall and 28” around. Prices range from $25-$55 or so.

 
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