Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - January 12th, 2006
Genesis – The Platinum Collection (Rhino Records)
This three-disc retrospective takes listeners on a journey through the band’s catalog as it progressed from progressive darlings, with Peter Gabriel in the lead role, to a pop hit-making machine with one-time drummer Phil Collins out front. And the hits are all here, from “Mama” to “Illegal Alien” to “Tonight Tonight Tonight.” As well, there are selected Gabriel-era tunes such as “Cinema Show,” “Supper’s Ready,” even “The Knife” from 1971. As hits collections go, it’s got most everything, though extremely conspicuous by their absence are “Eleventh Earl of Mar,” the lead track from “Wind and Wuthering,” and especially “Watcher of the Skies.” That tune, with its ponderous mellotron and Collins’s Morse code rhythms on cymbals, was in many ways the definitive track from the band’s early years, and as such it certainly should have been included here.

Jesse Cook – The Ultimate Jesse Cook (Narada)
Flamenco? Jazz? Worldbeat? Classical? New Age? Guitarist supreme Jesse Cook hits them all, and probably a few other genres, on this two-disc collection. Cook starts off with the rollicking “Mario Takes A Walk,” his fingers flying over the fretboard. The same is true on the following “Air.” He obviously can sizzle, but he’s sensitive too. Case in point: “Breathing Below Surface,” where he extracts maximum voltage from an unusually restrained approach. He gets exotic on “Baghdad” and “Surrender.” And that’s only half of the first disc of this two-CD set. All of his six Narada albums are worth owning, but those who would like to familiarize themselves with his breathtaking acoustic excursions will enjoy this 26-song retrospective, which includes cuts from every album.


Hiromi – Spiral (Telarc)
Japanese-born and America-educated pianist Hiromi may lead what looks like a traditional jazz trio, but don’t be fooled. Though much of her music draws from the likes of Oscar Peterson and Ahmad Jamal, her use of synthesizers and her style takes her to places far beyond. Rather than the traditional route of taking solos from melodies, this music swirls and zips from end to end. And if the music on “Spiral” doesn’t make that clear, there’s the accompanying DVD, which shows Hiromi attacking a synthesizer placed atop her grand piano. Her rhythm section gets in on the act too, supporting her and also going out on their own. Bassist Tony Grey makes the opening title track as much his own as it is Hiromi’s. His rapid-fire staccato solo is impossibly fast and precise, giving way to Hiromi’s gentle solo. She gets her licks in too, of course, as on “Reverse,” yet she never loses her sense of swing.


Swing Out Sister – Live (Shanachie)
And you thought the ‘80s were over. Yet Swing Out Sister still fills the airwaves, particularly the smooth jazz stations, though Corrine Drewery and Andy Connell are firmly anchored in the British pop tradition. This live set was originally on their private label and sold on their club tour last summer, but it really bears little resemblance to that band. Keyboardist and co-leader Connell was absent from those shows, but at least the band had a horn section. Given the importance of trumpets and sax on hits like “Am I The Same Girl?” and “Breakout,” the hornless versions on this CD are interesting if not immediately embraceable. Covers of “La La Means I Love You” and “Stoned Soul Picnic” are engaging, and classic SOS tracks like “Forever Blue,” “Am I The Same Girl” and “Twilight World” benefit from the new arrangements.
 
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