Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - January 12th, 2006
Genesis – The Platinum Collection (Rhino Records)
This three-disc retrospective takes listeners on a journey through the band’s catalog as it progressed from progressive darlings, with Peter Gabriel in the lead role, to a pop hit-making machine with one-time drummer Phil Collins out front. And the hits are all here, from “Mama” to “Illegal Alien” to “Tonight Tonight Tonight.” As well, there are selected Gabriel-era tunes such as “Cinema Show,” “Supper’s Ready,” even “The Knife” from 1971. As hits collections go, it’s got most everything, though extremely conspicuous by their absence are “Eleventh Earl of Mar,” the lead track from “Wind and Wuthering,” and especially “Watcher of the Skies.” That tune, with its ponderous mellotron and Collins’s Morse code rhythms on cymbals, was in many ways the definitive track from the band’s early years, and as such it certainly should have been included here.

Jesse Cook – The Ultimate Jesse Cook (Narada)
Flamenco? Jazz? Worldbeat? Classical? New Age? Guitarist supreme Jesse Cook hits them all, and probably a few other genres, on this two-disc collection. Cook starts off with the rollicking “Mario Takes A Walk,” his fingers flying over the fretboard. The same is true on the following “Air.” He obviously can sizzle, but he’s sensitive too. Case in point: “Breathing Below Surface,” where he extracts maximum voltage from an unusually restrained approach. He gets exotic on “Baghdad” and “Surrender.” And that’s only half of the first disc of this two-CD set. All of his six Narada albums are worth owning, but those who would like to familiarize themselves with his breathtaking acoustic excursions will enjoy this 26-song retrospective, which includes cuts from every album.


Hiromi – Spiral (Telarc)
Japanese-born and America-educated pianist Hiromi may lead what looks like a traditional jazz trio, but don’t be fooled. Though much of her music draws from the likes of Oscar Peterson and Ahmad Jamal, her use of synthesizers and her style takes her to places far beyond. Rather than the traditional route of taking solos from melodies, this music swirls and zips from end to end. And if the music on “Spiral” doesn’t make that clear, there’s the accompanying DVD, which shows Hiromi attacking a synthesizer placed atop her grand piano. Her rhythm section gets in on the act too, supporting her and also going out on their own. Bassist Tony Grey makes the opening title track as much his own as it is Hiromi’s. His rapid-fire staccato solo is impossibly fast and precise, giving way to Hiromi’s gentle solo. She gets her licks in too, of course, as on “Reverse,” yet she never loses her sense of swing.


Swing Out Sister – Live (Shanachie)
And you thought the ‘80s were over. Yet Swing Out Sister still fills the airwaves, particularly the smooth jazz stations, though Corrine Drewery and Andy Connell are firmly anchored in the British pop tradition. This live set was originally on their private label and sold on their club tour last summer, but it really bears little resemblance to that band. Keyboardist and co-leader Connell was absent from those shows, but at least the band had a horn section. Given the importance of trumpets and sax on hits like “Am I The Same Girl?” and “Breakout,” the hornless versions on this CD are interesting if not immediately embraceable. Covers of “La La Means I Love You” and “Stoned Soul Picnic” are engaging, and classic SOS tracks like “Forever Blue,” “Am I The Same Girl” and “Twilight World” benefit from the new arrangements.
 
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