Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Random Thoughts

George Foster - November 6th, 2003
The 10 Bravest American Women
As someone who believes that women are of a more courageous species than men, any manageable list of this sort is difficult to compress. Historically, high probabilities of being objects of discrimination and abuse tend to make women mentally tougher than men. At least that‘s my theory.
Here are the ten bravest women that our country has produced (inverse order).
(10) During the War of 1812, lovable Dolly Madison salvaged a priceless portrait of George Washington and important papers from the White House while Washington, D.C. was being torched by the British. Most first ladies would have run like hell. Which begs the question, where was her nerd of a husband while Dolly was risking life and limb for the White House antiquities?
(9) When mild-mannered Rosa Parks parked herself in the front of a Montgomery, Alabama bus in 1955, she sparked a Civil Rights movement that continues today.
(8) In an era when women weren‘t even allowed to vote, Mary Baker Eddy founded a major religion (Christian Science in 1876) and a major newspaper (Christian Science Monitor in 1908). No woman has ever done either, let alone both.
(7) Sojourner Truth was born a slave and never learned to read or write. At the ripe age of 46, “voices“ told Truth to become a traveling evangelist. Her amazing oratorical skills enlightened northerners on the evils of slavery as she rose in the ranks of abolitionists. Often threatened, she was beaten severely in Kansas for having the audacity to speak in public as an illiterate black woman. Later, she became a voice for all women‘s rights.
(6) As a nurse in New York during the early 1900‘s, Margaret Sanger saw many poor women injured and die from attempting to end unwanted pregnancies. After becoming an activist for contraception, Sanger was continually arrested and imprisoned for giving out information on birth control.
(5) In 1608 Pocahontas saved John Smith from execution by her father - Algonquin chief Powhatan. It seems the Native American teenager put her own body in front of Captain Smith as the chief‘s henchmen began to club him. Later, her efforts saved Jamestown from starvation - and inspired a movie.
(4) Deborah Samson could not take “no“ for an answer after initial attempts to fight for her country in the Revolutionary War. In 1782 she dressed as a man and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts Regiment as “Robert Shurtliff“. She was wounded in the thigh and head during battle but refused treatment for fear of discovery. After passing out from her injuries, though, the examining physician concluded she was not a man...duh. She was given an honorably discharge and later, Paul Revere convinced the government to award Samson a pension of $4 per month.
(3) Carrie Nation was one tough old bird. In her obsession to close saloons beginning in 1899, the hulking Ms. Nation had the habit of charging into the toughest bars, while smashing bottles with her hatchet and screaming at the drunks in her way. Could it be because no one ever asked Carrie to dance? Was she actually upset because women were compelled to wear pious hoods and multi-layers of petticoats in public? Carrie Nation got her wish when Prohibition was passed several years later.
(2) As the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Amelia Earhardt was fearless. At 40, she disappeared over the Pacific during a death-defying attempt at an around-the-world flight record. The mystery of her apparent crash and adventuring spirit still captures our imagination and inspires women to smash down barriers.
(1) Harriet Tubman may be the bravest American ever, male or female. She led over 300 slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad during 19 daring trips back and forth after 1849. Those, who attempted to impede her expeditions, were dissuaded after looking down the barrel of her loaded revolver. During the Civil War, Tubman worked as a laundress, nurse, and spy. In “retirement“, she worked tirelessly to help needy African-Americans.
 
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