Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · From Pain to Hope
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From Pain to Hope

Carina Hume - May 18th, 2006
A face with big blue eyes stares out from the canvas, marred by tears and a bright pink X where a smile should have been. The young girl, without a voice or a sense of place, is another casualty in the aftermath of a loved-one’s addiction.
The story is one of many illustrated by life-sized colorful canvases, shadow boxes and words of remembrance, to highlight the art exhibit, “From Pain to Hope.”
The exhibit opens May 13 in the lower level gallery of the Crooked Tree Arts Center in downtown Petoskey. It’s supported by a grant from the Petoskey-Harbor Springs Area Community Foundation.
This is the first time that substance abuse has been presented in Petoskey through art in such a visible way.
Dan Juntunen, outpatient coordinator for Harbor Hall, came up with the idea as a way to share information. “I’ve had this idea for a long time to try to find a way to help raise awareness in the community of how substance abuse just doesn’t impact, necessarily, the people who are using it,” he says.
The exhibit is important, Juntunen adds, because individuals with addictions get treated, but not the communities doing the enabling.
“The intention was to empower adolescents who are in recovery through creative expression,” says Kate Winnell, a facilitator for the Safe Harbor Family Support Group, which specializes in helping adolescents and their families. She assisted Juntunen in applying for the project’s grant.
“They are in a period of shame and guilt and feel a major disconnect or alienation from the community,” she adds.
The exhibit helps adolescents understand that even while struggling with events in their lives, they still have something to give back. “They’re able to bring that out in the arts,” Winnell says.
Eight hand-painted murals, with talk bubbles explaining many pictures, provide an in-your-face experience. Juntunen believes the size of the stretched canvas is an added benefit.
“The bigger the better for this because it’s to where you have to take notice of what’s being said, and many of these groups are (those) that don’t have a voice,” he says.
Anonymity prevails as the artwork is essentially unsigned – it’s the sharing of the story, not the artist’s identity that’s most important.

SNOWBALL EFFECT
Students from the public and alternative schools of Petoskey and Harbor Springs were the original targets for the project.
“This whole thing began addressing strictly the youth in this community because so many of them feel like they’re not heard and they’re not paid attention to,” Juntunen explains. But families and other interested parties also got involved in the project. Not everyone could participate, however; at one point, Juntunen heard the comment, “I would love my son to be a part of this but he’s in jail right now.”
The art project grew to include inmates at the Emmet County Jail, a judge, counselors, teachers, probation officers, health professionals, and virtually anyone who had something to share. Word-of-mouth introduced many people to the project.
For many people affected by substance abuse, the art project was the first time they’d ever been asked how they felt.
“Some of the most moving, emotional stories have come out of the professionals,” Juntunen says, recalling a surgeon whose success in life never revealed the trauma of his youth.
Letters from prisoners who wanted to be a part of the project began arriving, providing another aspect of the exhibit. “We’ll have the letters available,” Juntunen says, “where someone can just sit down and read the letters that have been written.”
HELPING HANDS
Volunteer Kathy Bruehl is working on ways to make the show an interactive event. Currently, she’s casing the town in the hopes of adding more hands to the project – paper hands, that is – to help lift up the community with continued support.
“There is a big wood beam (in the lower level gallery of the arts center); it’s a foot wide and we’re going to put ‘Hope’ at the top,” said Bruehl. “We’re [photocopying] hands which are going to be attached chaotically, reaching up and out.”
The torn-out, colored paper hands are symbolic, and one student from the court-run Lakeview Academy school in downtown Petoskey and her probation officer even went to the county building in search of more. It’s Bruehl’s goal to get as many hands as possible on that beam. She hasn’t been turned down yet.

PICTURES TELL THE STORY
Although similar themes have appeared on the canvases – bars, hearts and tears are common – each story is unique.
“Most of these kids, they get dealt something,” said Bruehl, relating the story of a girl “born into” a home where the smell of marijuana and incense was the norm. Migraines from the combination are still a part of the young woman’s life. Her picture is of a flower with tiny faces in the middle of it.
Juntunen recalled the answer a nine-year-old boy gave to the question, “What do families need the most?” “Freedom,” he said pointing to the boy’s picture of a red, white and blue eagle, its beak open, two yellow eyes staring out with a U.S. flag tucked in one of its black wings.
An inmate’s picture of a road shows one car heading toward college and a police car going to Jackson prison. His story? He was on his way to college and made a wrong turn.
A picture of a hand represents a single mother of four boys struggling to stick together, their motto being, “Together we can make it as a whole hand.”
One recovering addict wrote a poem which will be set to music; another, a student from Petoskey High School, filmed some interviews.

HEALING
The exhibit’s original intent was to raise awareness, but it’s also been a form of therapy for the participants. “It’s enabled many of the young men who are actually now in prison, to work through (their experience) on the canvas,” Juntunen says. “They made choices, they put dreams down, it’s enabled them to help cope.”
“There’s been some relief,” he adds. “There’s been an intensification of feelings for some. It’s brought up feelings they maybe haven’t allowed themselves to feel.”

“From Pain to Hope – A Community Art Exhibit” will be in the lower level gallery at Crooked Tree Arts Center beginning Saturday, May 13 and ending Saturday, June 10. Gallery hours are Mon.-Fri. 9-5, Sat. 10-4 and Sundays in June, from Noon-4. An opening reception takes place on Wednesday, May 17 at 7 p.m. at the arts center. A film created by a recovering Petoskey High School addict and a poem set to music will be performed with a reception following. Everyone is welcome.


 
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