Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Norovirus: The Super Virus
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Norovirus: The Super Virus

Harley Sachs - May 25th, 2006
It comes on without warning. One minute you feel okay. The next you are
doubled up with nausea, diarrhea, a fever, and unable to keep anything down. You’re laid up for 24 to 72 hours. The result, besides extreme discomfort, is dehydration that can be life threatening. We learned it was the Norovirus.
We just experienced an epidemic of that disease at the retirement building where I winter in Portland, Oregon. Of 240 residents, 80 were stricken. Of 115 staff members, 46 were put out of action. Five of our elderly residents were put in the hospital because of dehydration.Fortunately no one died.
We were lucky. Across the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington, three
elderly residents did die. A number of ambulance and health care personnel promptly caught the disease. Usually the Norovirus is not fatal except for the already infirm elderly and very young children. But it is so virulent, its spread is difficult to contain.
Originally called the Norwalk virus because it broke out in an elementary
school in Ohio, the Norovirus is called by Dr. David Matson of Eastern Virginia Medical School an “industrial strength” protein. While the more common diarrhea rotavirus that attacks children needs 10,000 particles for a kid to catch it, the norovirus needs only 10.
Unlike influenza, polio, and rhinoviruses, the Norovirus has no fatty lipid element that would make it easier to destroy. There is no treatment and no cure. One simply tries to hold out until it passes and not get dangerously dehydrated That’s difficult when you can’t eat or drink anything and keep it down.
When the virus struck our retirement community the chef had to shut down
the salad bar and cancel all community dinners and parties involving food. People were forbidden to visit the residents’ health center. Everyone was cautioned to wash their hands frequently. We lived in a state of siege for several weeks while the illness ran its course.
The illness caused local schools to close while the staff tried to disinfect everything with bleach water. The virus can hang around on hard surfaces for weeks and is more persistent in the environment than AIDS. People who have had it can continue to slough off bits of the dangerous protein
for days after the end of symptoms. It can even hang around in carpets and be stirred
up by simply walking across the room.
No wonder the Norovirus does well in dense populations like schools, cruise ships, and retirement buildings.
Its persistence is amazing. It was reported that in 1998 a Slovenian raspberry grower irrigated his crop with contaminated water. The virus settled on the berries and survived their being turned into juice that was exported to 13 countries. When the disease struck a contingent of British troops in Afghanistan it was suspected as being a biological warfare agent. As such, it could be an excellent weapon: persistent, debilitating, and not fatal. You can’t fight if you are sick.
What should do if you come down with the Norovirus? Stay in bed, avoid contact with other people. Wash your hands frequently, and try to keep up your liquid intake. Even after your symptoms have disappeared, remember that you can still pass on the contagion. The kicker is that having had it once you do not acquire an immunity. You can catch it again, and your resistance is lower next time.
It seems that as quickly as we find new medicines, diseases evolve that are resistant or immune. Norovirus is usually not fatal. Bird flu is and about 50% who catch it die. If the protein for the norovirus somehow hooked up with the bird flu and added its contagion to the mortality of the bird disease the human race would be in dire danger. I think I’ll skip the cruise.

Harley L. Sachs, visit the web site
and listen to two stories broadcast on the BBC (broadband high speed recommended!) and read extensive reviews.
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